August 27, 2014

Redundant index is not always bad

About year ago Peter wrote about redundant indexes and mentioned sometimes it is good to leave two indexes, even one is first part of another. I’m speaking about BTREE indexes, for example, KEY (A), and KEY (A,B). From SQL point of view KEY(A) is not needed, as for queries like WHERE A=5 the index (A,B) […]

Examining the TokuDB MySQL storage engine file structure

As we know different storage engines in MySQL have different file structures. Every table in MySQL 5.6 must have a .frm file in the database directory matching the table name. But where the rest of the data resides depends on the storage engine. For MyISAM we have .MYI and .MYD files in the database directory […]

Q&A: Even More Deadly Mistakes of MySQL Development

On Wednesday I gave a presentation on “How to Avoid Even More Common (but Deadly) MySQL Development Mistakes” for Percona MySQL Webinars.  If you missed it, you can still register to view the recording and my slides. Thanks to everyone who attended, and especially to folks who asked the great questions.  I answered as many as we had […]

Check for MySQL slave lag with Percona Toolkit plugin for Tungsten Replicator

A while back, I made some changes to the plugin interface for pt-online-schema-change which allows custom replication checks to be written. As I was adding this functionality, I also added the –plugin option to pt-table-checksum. This was released in Percona Toolkit 2.2.8. With these additions, I spent some time writing a plugin that allows Percona […]

Row-based replication, MySQL 5.6 upgrades and temporal data types

Whither your rollback plan? MySQL 5.6 upgrades are in full swing these days and knowing how to safely upgrade from MySQL 5.5 to 5.6 is important. When upgrading a replication environment, it’s important that you can build a migration plan that safely allows for your upgrade with minimal risk — rollback is often a very […]

How to identify and cure MySQL replication slave lag

Here on the Percona MySQL Support team, we often see issues where a customer is complaining about replication delays – and many times the problem ends up being tied to MySQL replication slave lag. This of course is nothing new for MySQL users and we’ve had a few posts here on the MySQL Performance Blog […]

The ARCHIVE Storage Engine – does it do what you expect?

Sometimes there is a need for keeping large amounts of old, rarely used data without investing too much on expensive storage. Very often such data doesn’t need to be updated anymore, or the intent is to leave it untouched. I sometimes wonder what I should really suggest to our Support customers. For this purpose, the […]

A closer look at Percona Server 5.6

Yesterday we announced the GA release of Percona Server 5.6, the latest release of our enhanced, drop-in replacement for MySQL. Percona Server 5.6 is the best free MySQL alternative for demanding applications. Our third major release, Percona Server 5.6 offers all the improvements found in MySQL 5.6 Community Edition plus scalability, availability, backup, and security […]

Inexpensive SSDs for Database Workloads

The cost of SSDs has been dropping rapidly, and at the time of this writing, 2.5-drives have reached the 1TB capacity mark.  You can actually get inexpensive drives for as little as 60 cents per GB. Even inexpensive SSDs can perform tens of thousands of IOPs and come with 1.5M – 2M hous MTBF and […]

How InnoDB promotes UNIQUE constraints

The other day I was running pt-duplicate-key-checker on behalf of a customer and noticed some peculiar recommendations on an InnoDB table with an odd structure (no PRIMARY key, but multiple UNIQUE constraints). This got me thinking about how InnoDB promotes UNIQUE constraints to the role of PRIMARY KEYs. The documentation is pretty clear: [DOCS] When […]