July 30, 2014

Recovering from a bad UPDATE statement

Did you just run an UPDATE against your 10 million row users table without a WHERE clause?  Did you know that in MySQL 5.5 that sometimes you can recover from a bad UPDATE statement?  This is possible if you are running in binlog_format=ROW ! Imagine this scenario:

We run an accidental UPDATE statement that […]

Another reason why SQL_SLAVE_SKIP_COUNTER is bad in MySQL

It is everywhere in the world of MySQL that if your replication is broken because an event caused a duplicate key or a row was not found and it cannot be updated or deleted, then you can use ‘ STOP SLAVE; SET GLOBAL SQL_SLAVE_SKIP_COUNTER=1; START SLAVE; ‘ and be done with it. In some cases this is fine and you can repair the […]

Why audit logging with triggers in MySQL is bad for replication

Recently I was tasked with investigating slippage between master and slave in a standard replication setup. The client was using Maatkit’s mk-table-checksum to check his slave data was indeed a fair copy of that of the master.

Recovery beyond data restore

Quite frequently I see customers looking at MySQL recovery as on ability to restore data from backup which can be far from being enough to restore the whole system to operating state, especially for complex systems. Instead of looking just at data restore process you better look at the whole process which is required to […]

Sysbench Benchmarking of Tesora’s Database Virtualization Engine

Tesora, previously called Parelastic, asked Percona to do a sysbench benchmark evaluation of its Database Virtualization Engine on specific architectures on Amazon EC2. The focus of Tesora is to provide a scalable Database As A Service platform for OpenStack. The Database Virtualization Engine (DVE) plays a part in this as it aims at allowing databases […]

Tools and tips for analysis of MySQL’s Slow Query Log

MySQL has a nice feature, slow query log, which allows you to log all queries that exceed a predefined about of time to execute. Peter Zaitsev first wrote about this back in 2006 – there have been a few other posts here on the MySQL Performance Blog since then (check this and this, too) but […]

PERFORMANCE_SCHEMA vs Slow Query Log

A couple of weeks ago, shortly after Vadim wrote about Percona Cloud Tools and using Slow Query Log to capture the data, Mark Leith asked why don’t we just use Performance Schema instead? This is an interesting question and I think it deserves its own blog post to talk about. First, I would say main […]

The ARCHIVE Storage Engine – does it do what you expect?

Sometimes there is a need for keeping large amounts of old, rarely used data without investing too much on expensive storage. Very often such data doesn’t need to be updated anymore, or the intent is to leave it untouched. I sometimes wonder what I should really suggest to our Support customers. For this purpose, the […]

Percona XtraBackup – A workaround to the failed assertion bug

I recently conducted a test backup of my “master-slave” setup in my VirtualBox as I was migrating from Percona Server 5.6.12 to version 5.6.13-rel61.0 with Percona XtraBackup v2.2.0 rev. 4885. However, doing the backup on my slave, I encountered this problem:

This is related to a bug posted by my colleague George https://bugs.launchpad.net/percona-xtrabackup/+bug/1177201. While I was […]

High-availability options for MySQL, October 2013 update

The technologies allowing to build highly-available (HA) MySQL solutions are in constant evolution and they cover very different needs and use cases. In order to help people choose the best HA solution for their needs, we decided, Jay Janssen and I, to publish, on a regular basis (hopefully, this is the first), an update on […]