July 24, 2014

Distributed set processing performance analysis with ICE 3.5.2pl1 at 20 nodes.

Demonstrating distributed set processing performance Shard-Query + ICE scales very well up to at least 20 nodes This post is a detailed performance analysis of what I’ve coined “distributed set processing”. Please also read this post’s “sister post” which describes the distributed set processing technique. Also, remember that Percona can help you get up and […]

Distributed Set Processing with Shard-Query

Can Shard-Query scale to 20 nodes? Peter asked this question in comments to to my previous Shard-Query benchmark. Actually he asked if it could scale to 50, but testing 20 was all I could due to to EC2 and time limits. I think the results at 20 nodes are very useful to understand the performance: […]

InnoDB Flushing: a lot of memory and slow disk

You may have seen in the last couple of weekly news posts that Baron mentioned we are working on a new adaptive flushing algorithm in InnoDB. In fact, we already have three such algorithms in Percona Server (reflex, estimate, keep_average). Why do we need one more? Okay, first let me start by showing the current […]

MySQL on Amazon RDS part 2: Determining Peak Throughput

This is a continuation of my series of benchmark posts comparing Amazon RDS to a server running on Amazon EC2. Upcoming posts (probably 6 or 8 in total) will extend the scope of the benchmark to include data on our Dell r900 with traditional hard drives in RAID10, and a server in the Joyent cloud. […]

MySQL on Amazon RDS part 1: insert performance

Amazon’s Relational Database Service (RDS) is a cloud-hosted MySQL solution. I’ve had some clients hitting performance limitations on standard EC2 servers with EBS volumes (see SSD versus EBS death match), and one of them wanted to evaluate RDS as a replacement. It is built on the same technologies, but the hardware and networking are supposed […]

Death match! EBS versus SSD price, performance, and QoS

Is it a good idea to deploy your database into the cloud? It depends. I have seen it work well many times, and cause trouble at other times. In this blog post I want to examine cloud-based I/O. I/O matters a lot when a) the database’s working set is bigger than the server’s memory, or […]

Sharing an auto_increment value across multiple MySQL tables (revisited)

A couple of weeks ago I blogged about Sharing an auto_increment value across multiple MySQL tables. In the comments, a few people wrote in to suggest alternative ways of implementing this.  I just got around to benchmarking those alternatives today across two large EC2 machines: