April 19, 2014

More on table_cache

In my previous post I looked into how large table_cache actually can decrease performance. The “miss” path is getting more expensive very quickly as table cache growths so if you’re going to have high miss ratio anyway you’re better off with small table cache. What I have not checked though is how does table_cache (or […]

MySQL-Memcached or NOSQL Tokyo Tyrant – part 2

Part 1 of our series set-up our “test”  application and looked at boosting performance of the application by buffer MySQL with memcached.  Our test application is simple and requires only 3 basic operations per transaction 2 reads and 1 write.  Using memcached combined with MySQL we ended up nearly getting a 10X performance boost from […]

Maatkit Now Supports Memcached

Have you ever wondered how optimized your Memcached installation is? There is a common misconception that one doesn’t have to think too deeply about Memcached performance, but that is not true. If your setup is inefficient, you could: Burn Memory Waste Network Round-Trips Store Keys That Never Get Retrieved Have a Low Cache Hit Ratio […]

Cache Performance Comparison

Jay Pipes continues cache experiements and has compared performance of MySQL Query Cache and File Cache. Jay uses Apache Benchmark to compare full full stack, cached or not which is realistic but could draw missleading picture as contribution of different components may be different depending on your unique applications. For example for application containing a […]

MySQL Query Cache

MySQL has a great feature called “Query Cache” which is quite helpful for MySQL Performance optimization tasks but there are number of things you need to know. First let me clarify what MySQL Query Cache is – I’ve seen number of people being confused, thinking MySQL Query Cache is the same as Oracle Query Cache […]

What MySQL buffer cache hit rate should you target

“What cache hit rate is good for optimal MySQL Performance” is typical question I’m asked. It could by MyISAM key_buffer or Innodb innodb_buffer_pool it does not really matter. In both cases trying to come up with constant “good” hit rate is looking for trouble. Well of course you can name 100% hit rate and all […]

Percona Cloud Tools: Making MySQL performance easy

One of our primary focuses at Percona is performance. Let me make some statements on what is “performance.” In doing so I will refer to two pieces of content: Carry Millsap’s talk “Performance Instrumentation: Beyond What You Do Now” [1] White Paper (by Peter and Baron) “Goal-Driven Performance Optimization” [2] I highly recommend that you […]

Why don’t our new Nagios plugins use caching?

In response to the release of our new MySQL monitoring plugins on Friday, one commenter asked why the new Nagios plugins don’t use caching. It’s worth answering in a post rather than a comment, because there is an important principle that needs to be understood to monitor servers correctly. But first, some history. When I […]

KISS KISS KISS

When I visit customers quite often they tell me about number of creative techniques they heard on the conferences, read on the blogs, forums and Internet articles and they ask me if they should use them. My advice is frequently – do not. It is fun to be creative but creative solutions also means unproven […]

Predicting Performance improvements from memory increase

One common question I guess is how much should I see performance improved in case I increase memory say from 16GB to 32GB. The benefit indeed can be very application dependent – if you have working set of say 30GB with uniform data access raising memory from 16GB to 32GB can improve performance order of […]