August 30, 2014

A closer look at the MySQL ibdata1 disk space issue and big tables

A recurring and very common customer issue seen here at the Percona Support team involves how to make the ibdata1 file “shrink” within MySQL. I can only imagine there’s a degree of regret by some of the InnoDB architects on their design decisions regarding disk-space management by the shared tablespace* because this has been a big […]

Inexpensive SSDs for Database Workloads

The cost of SSDs has been dropping rapidly, and at the time of this writing, 2.5-drives have reached the 1TB capacity mark.  You can actually get inexpensive drives for as little as 60 cents per GB. Even inexpensive SSDs can perform tens of thousands of IOPs and come with 1.5M – 2M hous MTBF and […]

Why is the ibdata1 file continuously growing in MySQL?

We receive this question about the ibdata1 file in MySQL very often in Percona Support. The panic starts when the monitoring server sends an alert about the storage of the MySQL server – saying that the disk is about to get filled. After some research you realize that most of the disk space is used […]

When (and how) to move an InnoDB table outside the shared tablespace

In my last post, “A closer look at the MySQL ibdata1 disk space issue and big tables,” I looked at the growing ibdata1 problem under the perspective of having big tables residing inside the so-called shared tablespace. In the particular case that motivated that post, we had a customer running out of disk space in his […]

New in Percona Replication Manager: Slave resync, Async stop

Percona Replication Manager (PRM) continues to evolve and improve, I want to introduce two new features: Slave resync and Async stop. Slave resync This behavior is for regular non-gtid replication.  When a master crashes and is no longer available, how do we make sure all the slaves are in a consistent state. It is easy […]

How to identify and cure MySQL replication slave lag

Here on the Percona MySQL Support team, we often see issues where a customer is complaining about replication delays – and many times the problem ends up being tied to MySQL replication slave lag. This of course is nothing new for MySQL users and we’ve had a few posts here on the MySQL Performance Blog […]

How to find bugs in MySQL

Finding bugs in MySQL is not only fun, it’s also something I have been doing the last four years of my life. Whether you want to become the next Shane Bester (who is generally considered the most skilled MySQL bug hunter worldwide), or just want to prove you can outsmart some of the world’s best […]

Heartbleed: Separating FAQ From FUD

If you’ve been following this blog (my colleague, David Busby, posted about it yesterday) or any tech news outlet in the past few days, you’ve probably seen some mention of the “Heartbleed” vulnerability in certain versions of the OpenSSL library. So what is ‘Heartbleed’, really? In short, Heartbleed is an information-leak issue. An attacker can […]

Tools and tips for analysis of MySQL’s Slow Query Log

MySQL has a nice feature, slow query log, which allows you to log all queries that exceed a predefined about of time to execute. Peter Zaitsev first wrote about this back in 2006 – there have been a few other posts here on the MySQL Performance Blog since then (check this and this, too) but […]

Engineer duo from Google, LinkedIn join again for InnoDB talks

Google senior systems engineer Jeremy Cole is once again teaming with LinkedIn senior software engineer Davi Arnaut for two InnoDB-focused sessions at the upcoming Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo 2014 this April 1-4 in Santa Clara, California. The duo will present “InnoDB: A journey to the core II” on April 2 and “InnoDB: A […]