April 21, 2014

MySQL and the SSB – Part 2 – MyISAM vs InnoDB low concurrency

This blog post is part two in what is now a continuing series on the Star Schema Benchmark. In my previous blog post I compared MySQL 5.5.30 to MySQL 5.6.10, both with default settings using only the InnoDB storage engine.  In my testing I discovered that innodb_old_blocks_time had an effect on performance of the benchmark.  There was […]

How to recover a single InnoDB table from a Full Backup

Sometimes we need to restore only some tables from a full backup maybe because your data loss affect a small number of your tables. In this particular scenario is faster to recover single tables than a full backup. This is easy with MyISAM but if your tables are InnoDB the process is a little bit […]

Tuning InnoDB Concurrency Tickets

InnoDB has an oft-unused parameter innodb_concurrency_tickets that seems widely misunderstood. From the docs: “The number of threads that can enter InnoDB concurrently is determined by the innodb_thread_concurrency variable. A thread is placed in a queue when it tries to enter InnoDB if the number of threads has already reached the concurrency limit. When a thread […]

A quest for the full InnoDB status

When running InnoDB you are able to dig into the engine internals, look at various gauges and counters, see past deadlocks and the list of all open transactions. This is in your reach with one simple command —

. On most occasions it works beautifully. The problems appear when you have a large spike in […]

Innodb usability and ease of use.

It always surprised me how little Innodb team seems to think about product usability/ease of use, when it comes to settings, performance management etc. I could understand many things 5 years ago, like a lot of information being available only in hard to parse SHOW INNODB STATUS output or even uglier hacks with creating tables […]

Innotop: A real-time, advanced investigation tool for MySQL

GUI monitoring tools for MySQL are not always suitable for all our needs or situations. Most of them are designed to provide historical views into what happens to our database over time rather then real-time insight into current MySQL server status. Excellent free tools for this include Cacti, Zabbix, Ganglia, Nagios, etc. But each of […]

Percona XtraDB Cluster: Setting up a simple cluster

Percona XtraDB Cluster (PXC) is different enough from async replication that it can be a bit of a puzzle how to do things the Galera way.  This post will attempt to illustrate the basics of setting up 2 node PXC cluster from scratch. Requirements Two servers (could be VMs) that can talk to each other. […]

Crash-resistant replication: How to avoid MySQL replication errors

Percona Server’s “crash-resistant replication” feature is useful in versions 5.1 through 5.5. However, in Percona Server 5.6 it’s replaced with Oracle MySQL 5.6′s “crash safe replication” feature, which has it’s own implementation (you can read more about it here). A MySQL slave normally stores its position in files master.info and relay-log.info which are updated by […]

tpcc-mysql: Simple usage steps and how to build graphs with gnuplot

Lots of times we could see different benchmarks performed by tpcc-mysql. So today I want to tell you about how to use tpcc-mysql and how to build graphs with gnuplot in a few easy steps. As an example I’ll compare Percona Server 5.5 (latest version: 5.5.31) performance by changing InnoDB buffer pool size: innodb_buffer_pool_size = […]

2 new features added to Percona XtraDB Cluster (PXC) since 5.5.31

With the last Percona XtraDB Cluster (PXC) release, two major features were added: * a new command to bootstrap the cluster was added to the init script * SST via Xtrabackup now supports Xtrabackup 2.1 features In this post, I want to explain the benefits of these added features and how to use them. If […]