April 21, 2014

Make your file system error resilient

One of the typical problems I see setting up ext2/3/4 file system is sticking to defaults when it comes to behavior on errors. By default these filesystems are configured to Continue when error (such as IO error or meta data inconsistency) is discovered which can continue spreading corruption. This manifests itself in a worst way […]

A recovery trivia or how to recover from a lost ibdata1 file

A few day ago, a customer came to Percona needing to recover data. Basically, while doing a transfer from one SAN to another, something went wrong and they lost the ibdata1 file, where all the table meta-data is stored. Fortunately, they were running with innodb_file_per_table so the data itself was available. What they could provide […]

Connecting orphaned .ibd files

There are two ways InnoDB can organize tablespaces. First is when all data, indexes and system buffers are stored in a single tablespace. This is typicaly one or several ibdata files. A well known innodb_file_per_table option brings the second one. Tables and system areas are split into different files. Usually system tablespace is located in […]

How to syntax-check your my.cnf file

For a long time I’ve used a little trick to check whether there are syntax errors in a server’s my.cnf file. I do this when I need to shut down and restart the server, and I’ve either made changes to the file, or I’m worried that someone else has done so. I don’t want to […]

How long is recovery from 8G innodb_log_file

In my previous posts I highlighted that one of improvements in Percona Server is support of innodb_log_file_size > 4G. This test was done using Percona Server 5.5.7, but the same performance expected for InnoDB-plugin and MySQL 5.5.

MongoDB Approach to database synchronization

I went to MongoSF today – quite an event, and I hope to have a chance to write more about it. This post is about one replication problem and how MongoDB solves it. If you’re using MySQL Replication when your master goes down it is possible for some writes to be executed on the master, […]

How innodb_open_files affects performance

Recently I looked at table_cache sizing which showed larger table cache does not always provides the best performance. So I decided to look at yet another similar variable – innodb_open_files which defines how many files Innodb will keep open while working in innodb_file_per_table mode. Unlike MyISAM Innodb does not have to keep open file descriptor […]

Recovery after DROP [ TABLE | DATABASE ]

In your recovery practice we often face the problem when data lost by execution DROP TABLE or DROP DATABASE statement. In this case even our InnoDB Data Recovery tool can’t help, as table / directory with files was deleted (if you have innodb-file-per-table). And the same for MyISAM, all .MYD / .MYI / .frm – […]

Recovering CREATE TABLE statement from .frm file

So lets say you have .frm file for the table and you need to recover CREATE TABLE statement for this table. In particular when we do Innodb Recovery we often get .frm files and some mess in the Innodb tablespace from which we have to get data from. Of course we could relay on old […]

MySQL File System Fragmentation Benchmarks

Few days ago I wrote about testing writing to many files and seeing how this affects sequential read performance. I was very interested to see how it shows itself with real tables so I’ve got the script and ran tests for MyISAM and Innodb tables on ext3 filesystem. Here is what I found: