August 29, 2014

Group commit and real fsync

During the recent months I’ve seen few cases of customers upgrading to MySQL 5.0 and having serious performance slow downs, up to 10 times in certain cases. What was the most surprising for them is the problem was hardware and even OS specific – it could show up with one OS version but not in […]

Make a difference! See the world! Speak at Percona Live London; Santa Clara!

Twice each year members of the global open-source community converge on London in November and Santa Clara in April to network with, and learn from, some of the world’s most experienced and accomplished system architects, developers and DBAs. And now it’s time for YOU to give back to this diverse and growing MySQL community. The […]

What I learned while migrating a customer MySQL installation to Amazon RDS

Hi, I recently had the experience of assisting with a migration of a customer MySQL installation to Amazon RDS (Relational Database Service). Amazon RDS is a great platform for hosting your MySQL installation and offers the following list of pros and cons: You can scale your CPU, IOPS, and storage space separately by using Amazon […]

Managing shards of MySQL databases with MySQL Fabric

This is the fourth post in our MySQL Fabric series. In case you’re joining us now, we started with an introductory post, and then discussed High Availability (HA) using MySQL Fabric here (Part 1) and here (Part 2). Today we will talk about how MySQL Fabric can help you scale out MySQL databases with sharding. Introduction At the […]

Percona Server 5.6.19-67.0 with TokuDB (GA) now available

Percona is glad to announce the release of Percona Server 5.6.19-67.0 on July 1, 2014. Download the latest version from the Percona web site or from the Percona Software Repositories. Based on MySQL 5.6.19, including all the bug fixes in it, Percona Server 5.6.19-67.0 is the current GA release in the Percona Server 5.6 series. All of Percona’s […]

Why %util number from iostat is meaningless for MySQL capacity planning

Earlier this month I wrote about vmstat iowait cpu numbers and some of the comments I got were advertising the use of util% as reported by the iostat tool instead. I find this number even more useless for MySQL performance tuning and capacity planning. Now let me start by saying this is a really tricky and deceptive number. Many […]

Using MySQL 5.6 Performance Schema in multi-tenant environments

Hosting a shared MySQL instance for your internal or external clients (“multi-tenant”) was always a challenge. Multi-tenants approach or a “schema-per-customer” approach is pretty common nowadays to host multiple clients on the same MySQL sever. One of issues of this approach, however, is the lack of visibility: it is hard to tell how many resources (queries, disk, […]

Do not trust vmstat IOwait numbers

I’ve been running a benchmark today on my old test box with conventional hard drives (no raid with BBU) and noticed something unusual in the CPU utilization statistics being reported. The benchmark was run like this:

Which means: create 64 threads and hammer the database with queries as quickly as possible. As the test […]

High Availability with MySQL Fabric: Part II

This is the third post in our MySQL Fabric series. If you missed the previous two, we started with an overall introduction, and then a discussion of MySQL Fabric’s high-availability (HA) features. MySQL Fabric was RC when we started this series, but it went GA recently. You can read the press release here, and see this blog post from Oracle’s Mats […]

How to improve InnoDB performance by 55% for write-bound loads

During April’s Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo 2014, I attended a talk on MySQL 5.7 performance an scalability given by Dimitri Kravtchuk, the Oracle MySQL benchmark specialist. He mentioned at some point that the InnoDB double write buffer was a real performance killer. For the ones that don’t know what the innodb double write […]