April 20, 2014

How to Monitor MySQL with Percona’s Nagios Plugins

In this post, I’ll cover the new MySQL monitoring plugins we created for Nagios, and explain their features and intended purpose. I want to add a little context. What problem were we trying to solve with these plugins? Why yet another set of MySQL monitoring plugins? The typical problem with Nagios monitoring (and indeed with […]

Helgrinding MySQL with InnoDB for Synchronisation Errors, Fun and Profit

It is no secret that bugs related to multithreading–deadlocks, data races, starvations etc–have a big impact on application’s stability and are at the same time hard to find due to their nondeterministic nature.  Any tool that makes finding such bugs easier, preferably before anybody is aware of their existence, is very welcome.

Disaster: MySQL 5.5 Flushing

We raised topic of problems with flushing in InnoDB several times, some links: InnoDB Flushing theory and solutions MySQL 5.5.8 in search of stability This was not often recurring problem so far, however in my recent experiments, I observe it in very simple sysbench workload on hardware which can be considered as typical nowadays.

MySQL data via a NoSQL solution, Free ticket to Percona Live London

The much-anticipated ability to access MySQL data via a NoSQL solution has been realized. Using HandlerSocket, significant performance gains can be realized for certain workloads. Sound like something you are interested in? Join us for Percona Live London to hear Ryan Lowe, Percona’s Director of American Consulting speak on this subject. In Ryan’s session he […]

MySQL performance on EC2/EBS versus RDS

A while ago I started a series of posts showing benchmark results on Amazon EC2 servers with RAID’ed EBS volumes and MySQL, versus RDS machines. For reasons that won’t add anything to this discussion, I got sidetracked, and then time passed, and I no longer think it’s a good idea to publish those blog posts […]

Modeling MySQL Capacity by Measuring Resource Consumptions

There are many angles you can look at the system to predict in performance, the model baron has published for example is good for measuring scalability of the system as concurrency growths. In many cases however we’re facing a need to answer a question how much load a given system can handle when load is […]

How InnoDB handles REDO logging

Xaprb (Baron) recently blogged about how InnoDB performs a checkpoint , I thought it might be useful to explain another important mechanism that affects both response time and throughput – The transaction log.

An argument for not using mysqldump

I have a 5G mysqldump which takes 30 minutes to restore from backup.  That means that when the database reaches 50G, it should take 30×10=5 hours to restore.  Right?  Wrong.

HandlerSocket on SSD

We all enjoyed Yoshinori announcement of HandlerSocket, the plugin to MySQL which open NOSQL way to access data stored in InnoDB. The published results are impressive, but I want to understand some, that’s why I run couple more experiments. In blog post Yoshinori used the case when all data fits into memory, and one of […]

MySQL Limitations Part 4: One thread per connection

This is the third in a series on what’s seriously limiting MySQL in core use cases (links: part 1, 2, 3). This post is about the way MySQL handles connections, allocating one thread per connection to the server.