April 23, 2014

TokuDB vs InnoDB in timeseries INSERT benchmark

This post is a continuation of my research of TokuDB’s  storage engine to understand if it is suitable for timeseries workloads. While inserting LOAD DATA INFILE into an empty table shows great results for TokuDB, what’s more interesting is seeing some realistic workloads. So this time let’s take a look at the INSERT benchmark.

Checking B+tree leaf nodes list consistency in InnoDB

If we have InnoDB pages there are two ways to learn how many records they contain: PAGE_N_RECS field in the page header Count records while walking over the list of records from infimum to supremum In some previous revision of the recovery tool a short summary was added to a dump which is produced by […]

Recovering temporal types in MySQL 5.6: TIME, TIMESTAMP and DATETIME

MySQL 5.6 introduces a new feature – microseconds resolution in some temporal types. As of 5.6.4 TIME, TIMESTAMP and DATETIME can have a fractional part. To create a field with subseconds you can specify precision in brackets: TIME(3), DATETIME(6) etc. Obviously, the new feature requires the format change. All three types may now have a […]

Benchmarking Percona Server TokuDB vs InnoDB

After compiling Percona Server with TokuDB, of course I wanted to compare InnoDB performance vs TokuDB. I have a particular workload I’m interested in testing – it is an insert-intensive workload (which is TokuDB’s strong suit) with some roll-up aggregation, which should produce updates in-place (I will use INSERT .. ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE statements […]

MySQL optimizer: ANALYZE TABLE and Waiting for table flush

The MySQL optimizer makes the decision of what execution plan to use based on the information provided by the storage engines. That information is not accurate in some engines like InnoDB and they are based in statistics calculations therefore sometimes some tune is needed. In InnoDB these statistics are calculated automatically, check the following blog […]

Recovering from a bad UPDATE statement

Did you just run an UPDATE against your 10 million row users table without a WHERE clause?  Did you know that in MySQL 5.5 that sometimes you can recover from a bad UPDATE statement?  This is possible if you are running in binlog_format=ROW ! Imagine this scenario:

We run an accidental UPDATE statement that […]

Recovery after DROP & CREATE

In a very popular data loss scenario a table is dropped and empty one is created with the same name. This is because  mysqldump in many cases generates the “DROP TABLE” instruction before the “CREATE TABLE”:

If there were no subsequent CREATE TABLE the recovery would be trivial. Index_id of the PRIMARY index of […]

Recovery deleted ibdata1

Recently I had a case when a customer deleted the InnoDB main table space – ibdata1 – and redo logs – ib_logfile*. MySQL keeps InnoDB files open all the time. The following recovery technique is based on this fact and it allowed to salvage the database. Actually, the files were deleted long time ago – […]

On Character Sets and Disappearing Tables

The MySQL manual tells us that regardless of whether or not we use “SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS=0″ before making schema changes, InnoDB will not allow a column referenced by a foreign key constraint to be modified in such a way that the foreign key will reference a column with a mismatched data type. For instance, if we […]

Faster Point In Time Recovery with LVM2 Snaphots and Binary Logs

LVM snapshots is one powerful way of taking a consistent backup of your MySQL databases – but did you know that you can now restore directly from a snapshot (and binary logs for point in time recovery) in case of that ‘Oops’ moment? Let me show you quickly how. This howto assumes that you already […]