April 21, 2014

Measuring the amount of writes in InnoDB redo logs

Choosing a good InnoDB log file size is key to InnoDB write performance. This can be done by measuring the amount of writes in the redo logs. You can find a detailed explanation in this post. To sum up, here are the main points: The redo logs should be large enough to store at most […]

Adaptive flushing in MySQL 5.6 – cont

This is to continue my previous experiments on adaptive flushing in MySQL 5.6.6. Now I am running Ubuntu 12.04, which seems to provide a better throughput than previous system (CentOS 6.3), it also changes the profile of results. So, as previous I run tpcc-mysql 2500W, against MySQL 5.6.6 with innodb_buffer_pool_size 150GB, and now I vary […]

Adaptive flushing in MySQL 5.6

As you may know, flushing in MySQL is an area of my interest, I wrote about it several times, i.e. http://www.mysqlperformanceblog.com/2011/09/18/disaster-mysql-5-5-flushing/ http://www.mysqlperformanceblog.com/2011/03/31/innodb-flushing-a-lot-of-memory-and-slow-disk/ http://www.mysqlperformanceblog.com/2011/01/03/mysql-5-5-8-in-search-of-stability/ In MySQL 5.6 there was implemented a new flushing logic, so I decided to check what do we have now.

Binary log file size matters (sometimes)

I used to think one should never look at max_binlog_size, however last year I had a couple of interesting cases which showed that sometimes it may be very important variable to tune properly. I meant to write about it earlier but never really had a chance to do it. I have it now!

Faster Point In Time Recovery with LVM2 Snaphots and Binary Logs

LVM snapshots is one powerful way of taking a consistent backup of your MySQL databases – but did you know that you can now restore directly from a snapshot (and binary logs for point in time recovery) in case of that ‘Oops’ moment? Let me show you quickly how. This howto assumes that you already […]

The relationship between Innodb Log checkpointing and dirty Buffer pool pages

This is a time-honored topic, and there’s no shortage of articles on the topic on this blog. I wanted to write a post trying to condense and clarify those posts, as it has taken me a while to really understand this relationship. Some basic facts Most of us know that writing into Innodb updates buffer […]

Benchmarks of new innodb_flush_neighbor_pages

In our recent release of Percona Server 5.5.19 we introduced new value for innodb_flush_neighbor_pages=cont. This way we are trying to deal with the problem of InnoDB flushing.

Optimizing InnoDB for creating 30,000 tables (and nothing else)

Once upon a time, it would have been considered madness to even attempt to create 30,000 tables in InnoDB. That time is now a memory. We have customers with a lot more tables than a mere 30,000. There have historically been no tests for anything near this many tables in the MySQL test suite. So, […]

Innodb vs MySQL index counts

I had a customer recently who a few strange errors in their mysqld.err log:

This customer was running Percona Server 5.1 and they got this error on two tables during a maintenance window when they were adding indexes to the same tables.  We had a suspicion that it had something to do with Fast […]

Helgrinding MySQL with InnoDB for Synchronisation Errors, Fun and Profit

It is no secret that bugs related to multithreading–deadlocks, data races, starvations etc–have a big impact on application’s stability and are at the same time hard to find due to their nondeterministic nature.  Any tool that makes finding such bugs easier, preferably before anybody is aware of their existence, is very welcome.