April 19, 2014

Inexpensive SSDs for Database Workloads

The cost of SSDs has been dropping rapidly, and at the time of this writing, 2.5-drives have reached the 1TB capacity mark.  You can actually get inexpensive drives for as little as 60 cents per GB. Even inexpensive SSDs can perform tens of thousands of IOPs and come with 1.5M – 2M hous MTBF and […]

InnoDB performance optimization basics (redux)

I recently stumbled upon a post that Peter Zaitsev published back in 2007 titled “Innodb Performance Optimization Basics.” It’s a great post and reading it inspired me to examine what’s changed in the nearly six years that have followed in terms of MySQL, Percona Server – as well as in all of the other now-available […]

TokuDB vs InnoDB in timeseries INSERT benchmark

This post is a continuation of my research of TokuDB’s  storage engine to understand if it is suitable for timeseries workloads. While inserting LOAD DATA INFILE into an empty table shows great results for TokuDB, what’s more interesting is seeing some realistic workloads. So this time let’s take a look at the INSERT benchmark.

Benchmarking Percona Server TokuDB vs InnoDB

After compiling Percona Server with TokuDB, of course I wanted to compare InnoDB performance vs TokuDB. I have a particular workload I’m interested in testing – it is an insert-intensive workload (which is TokuDB’s strong suit) with some roll-up aggregation, which should produce updates in-place (I will use INSERT .. ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE statements […]

Measuring the amount of writes in InnoDB redo logs

Choosing a good InnoDB log file size is key to InnoDB write performance. This can be done by measuring the amount of writes in the redo logs. You can find a detailed explanation in this post. To sum up, here are the main points: The redo logs should be large enough to store at most […]

Percona Server tree with support of Fusion-io atomic writes and DirectFS

Not so long ago Fusion-io announced an SDK which provides direct API access to Fusion ioMemory(tm) in addition to providing a native filesystem (directFS) with a goal to avoid overhead from kernel and regular Linux filesystems: ext4 and xfs. This requires a support from application, it should use special calls for IO. With help from […]

How FLUSH TABLES WITH READ LOCK works with Innodb Tables

Many backup tools including Percona Xtrabackup, MyLVMBackup and others use FLUSH TABLES WITH READ LOCK to temporary make MySQL read only. In many cases the period for which server has to be made read only is very short, just few seconds, yet the impact of FLUSH TABLES WITH READ LOCK can be quite large because […]

The relationship between Innodb Log checkpointing and dirty Buffer pool pages

This is a time-honored topic, and there’s no shortage of articles on the topic on this blog. I wanted to write a post trying to condense and clarify those posts, as it has taken me a while to really understand this relationship. Some basic facts Most of us know that writing into Innodb updates buffer […]

Should MySQL update the default innodb_log_file_size?

Now that InnoDB is the default storage engine in MySQL, is it time to update the default configuration for the InnoDB log file size (innodb_log_file_size) setting? In general, there are two settings that simply can’t be left at their historical defaults for a production installation. MySQL 5.5 increased the default buffer pool size to something […]

Innodb Caching (part 2)

Few weeks ago I wrote about Innodb Caching with main idea you might need more cache when you think you are because Innodb caches data in pages, not rows, and so the whole page needs to be in memory even if you need only one row from it. I have created the simple benchmark which […]