August 28, 2014

MySQL Limitations Part 4: One thread per connection

This is the third in a series on what’s seriously limiting MySQL in core use cases (links: part 1, 2, 3). This post is about the way MySQL handles connections, allocating one thread per connection to the server.

Failover with the MySQL Utilities: Part 2 – mysqlfailover

In the previous post of this series we saw how you could use mysqlrpladmin to perform manual failover/switchover when GTID replication is enabled in MySQL 5.6. Now we will review mysqlfailover (version 1.4.3), another tool from the MySQL Utilities that can be used for automatic failover. Summary mysqlfailover can perform automatic failover if MySQL 5.6′s […]

Failover with the MySQL Utilities – Part 1: mysqlrpladmin

MySQL Utilities are a set of tools provided by Oracle to perform many kinds of administrative tasks. When GTID-replication is enabled, 2 tools can be used for slave promotion: mysqlrpladmin and mysqlfailover. We will review mysqlrpladmin (version 1.4.3) in this post. Summary mysqlrpladmin can perform manual failover/switchover when GTID-replication is enabled. You need to have […]

Replication in MySQL 5.6: GTIDs benefits and limitations – Part 2

The main benefit of using GTIDs is to have much easier failover than with file-based replication. We will see how to change the replication topology when using GTID-based replication. That will show where GTIDs shine and where improvements are expected. This is the second post of a series of articles focused on MySQL 5.6 GTIDs. […]

MySQL and the SSB – Part 2 – MyISAM vs InnoDB low concurrency

This blog post is part two in what is now a continuing series on the Star Schema Benchmark. In my previous blog post I compared MySQL 5.5.30 to MySQL 5.6.10, both with default settings using only the InnoDB storage engine.  In my testing I discovered that innodb_old_blocks_time had an effect on performance of the benchmark.  There was […]

Replication in MySQL 5.6: GTIDs benefits and limitations – Part 1

Global Transactions Identifiers are one of the new features regarding replication in MySQL 5.6. They open up a lot of opportunities to make the life of DBAs much easier when having to maintain servers under a specific replication topology. However you should keep in mind some limitations of the current implementation. This post is the […]

MySQL 5.6.10 Optimizer Limitations: Index Condition Pushdown

While preparing the webinar I will deliver this Friday, I ran into a quite interesting (although not very impacting) optimizer issue: a “SELECT *” taking half the time to execute than the same “SELECT one_indexed_column” query in MySQL 5.6.10. This turned into a really nice exercise for checking the performance and inner workings of one […]

Flexviews – part 3 – improving query performance using materialized views

Combating “data drift” In my first post in this series, I described materialized views (MVs). An MV is essentially a cached result set at one point in time. The contents of the MV will become incorrect (out of sync) when the underlying data changes. This loss of synchronization is sometimes called drift. This is conceptually […]

MySQL on Amazon RDS part 1: insert performance

Amazon’s Relational Database Service (RDS) is a cloud-hosted MySQL solution. I’ve had some clients hitting performance limitations on standard EC2 servers with EBS volumes (see SSD versus EBS death match), and one of them wanted to evaluate RDS as a replacement. It is built on the same technologies, but the hardware and networking are supposed […]

MySQL Limitations Part 3: Subqueries

This is the third in a series on what’s seriously limiting MySQL in certain circumstances (links: part 1, 2). This post is about subqueries, which in some cases execute outside-in instead of inside-out as users expect.