July 22, 2014

Dynamic row format for MEMORY tables

The latest Percona Server release has one new feature: now MEMORY tables can have BLOB and TEXT columns, and VARCHAR columns will not waste space due to implicit extension to CHAR.

The two even more fundamental performance metrics

In a recent blog post, I wrote about four fundamental metrics for system performance analysis. These are throughput, residence time, “weighted time” (the sum of all residence times in the observation period — the terminology is mine for lack of a better name), and concurrency. I derived all of these metrics from two “even more […]

InnoDB Flushing: a lot of memory and slow disk

You may have seen in the last couple of weekly news posts that Baron mentioned we are working on a new adaptive flushing algorithm in InnoDB. In fact, we already have three such algorithms in Percona Server (reflex, estimate, keep_average). Why do we need one more? Okay, first let me start by showing the current […]

Replication of MEMORY (HEAP) Tables

Some Applications need to store some transient data which is frequently regenerated and MEMORY table look like a very good match for this sort of tasks. Unfortunately this will bite when you will be looking to add Replication to your environment as MEMORY tables do not play well with replication.

InnoDB memory allocation, ulimit, and OpenSUSE

I recently encountered an interesting case. A customer reported that mysqld crashed on start on OpenSUSE 11.2 kernel 2.6.31.12-0.2-desktop x86_64   with 96 GB RAM when the innodb_buffer_pool_size was set to anything more than 62 GB. I decided to try it with 76 GB. The error message was an assert due to a failed malloc() […]

FlashCache: more benchmarks

Previously I covered simple case with FlashCache, when data fits into cache partitions, now I am trying to test when data is bigger than cache. But before test setup let me address some concern (which I also had). Intel X25-M has a write cache which is not battery backuped, so there is suspect you may […]

How much memory Innodb Dictionary can take ?

The amount of memory Innodb will require for its data dictionary depends on amount of tables you have as well as number of fields and indexes. Innodb allocates this memory once table is accessed and keeps until server is shut down. In XtraDB we have an option to restrict that limit. So how much memory […]

Adjusting Innodb for Memory resident workload

As larger and larger amount of memory become common (512GB is something you can fit into relatively commodity server this day) many customers select to build their application so all or most of their database (frequently Innodb) fits into memory. If all tables fit in Innodb buffer pool the performance for reads will be quite […]

How much memory can MySQL use in the worst case?

I vaguely recall a couple of blog posts recently asking something like “what’s the formula to compute mysqld’s worst-case maximum memory usage?” Various formulas are in wide use, but none of them is fully correct. Here’s why: you can’t write an equation for it.

More patches

After some pause we are going to announce bunch of patches we made and ported for last period. Ported patches (ported from Google V2 patch): – innodb_fsync_source.patch – Show information about callers of fsync, more info – innodb_io_tune.patch – Port of two patches InnodbIOTune and InnodbAsync, more info – innodb_extra_status.patch – Show more information about […]