August 21, 2014

MySQL Limitations Part 4: One thread per connection

This is the third in a series on what’s seriously limiting MySQL in core use cases (links: part 1, 2, 3). This post is about the way MySQL handles connections, allocating one thread per connection to the server.

Sharing an auto_increment value across multiple MySQL tables

The title is SEO bait – you can’t do it. We’ve seen a few recurring patterns trying to achieve similar – and I thought I would share with you my favorite two: Option #1: Use a table to insert into, and grab the insert_id:

Option #2: Use a table with one just row:

High availability for MySQL on Amazon EC2 – Part 2 – Setting up the initial instances

This post is the second of a series that started here. The first step to build the HA solution is to create two working instances, configure them to be EBS based and create a security group for them. A third instance, the client, will be discussed in part 7. Since this will be a proof […]

High availability for MySQL on Amazon EC2 – Part 1 – Intro

Like many, I have been seduced by the power and flexibility of Amazon EC2. Being able to launch new instances at will depending on the load, is almost too good to be true. Amazon has also some drawbacks, availability is not guaranteed and discovery protocols relying on Ethernet broadcast or multicast cannot be used. That […]

Is disk Everything for MySQL Performance ?

I read very nice post by Matt today and it has many good insights though I can’t say I agree on all points. First there is a lot of people out where which put it as disk is everything. Remember Paul Tuckfield saying “You should ask how many disks they have instead of how many […]

Webinar on Read/Write Splitting with PHP

I’ll be presenting a webinar next Wednesday, January 23 at 10 a.m. (Pacific Time), about issues application developers should think about for scaling out read-query traffic using multiple MySQL instances in a replication pair. Specifically, about the care we have to take because replication is asynchronous.  This means the slave  may not have current data […]

DBaaS, OpenStack and Trove 101: Introduction to the basics

We’ll be publishing a series of posts on OpenStack and Trove over the next few weeks, diving into their usage and purpose. For readers who are already familiar with these technologies, there should be no doubt as to why we are incredibly excited about them, but for those who aren’t, consider this a small introduction […]

Exploring message brokers

Message brokers are not regularly covered here but are, nonetheless, important web-related technologies. Some time ago, I was asked by one of our customer to review a selection of OSS message brokers and propose a couple of good candidates. The requirements were fairly simple: behave well when there’s a large backlog of messages, be able […]

ScaleArc: Benchmarking with sysbench

ScaleArc recently hired Percona to perform various tests on its database traffic management product. This post is the outcome of the benchmarks carried out by Uday Sawant (ScaleArc) and myself. You can also download the report directly as a PDF here. The goal of these benchmarks is to identify the potential overhead of the ScaleArc […]

Notes from the Newb

Notes from the Newb. I’m relatively new to MySQL having come from the world of embedded micro-databases, and though I’m pretty familiar with a number of database systems, I’ve discovered that I have a lot to learn about MySQL. As a new member to the Percona team, I thought I’d have an ongoing blog theme […]