July 23, 2014

MySQL on Amazon RDS part 2: Determining Peak Throughput

This is a continuation of my series of benchmark posts comparing Amazon RDS to a server running on Amazon EC2. Upcoming posts (probably 6 or 8 in total) will extend the scope of the benchmark to include data on our Dell r900 with traditional hard drives in RAID10, and a server in the Joyent cloud. […]

Modeling MySQL Capacity by Measuring Resource Consumptions

There are many angles you can look at the system to predict in performance, the model baron has published for example is good for measuring scalability of the system as concurrency growths. In many cases however we’re facing a need to answer a question how much load a given system can handle when load is […]

Rare evil MySQL Bug

There is the rare bug which I ran into every so often. Last time I’ve seen it about 3 years ago on MySQL 4.1 and I hoped it is long fixed since… but it looks like it is not. I now get to see MySQL 5.4.2 in the funny state. When you see bug happening […]

5.4 in-memory tpcc-like load

As continue to my benchmarks http://www.mysqlperformanceblog.com/2009/04/30/looking-on-54-io-bound-benchmarks/ on 5.4 I tried in-memory load (basically changed buffer pool from 3GB to 15GB, and database size is 10GB). The results are on the same spreadsheet http://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=rYZB2dd2j1pQsvWs2kFvTsg&hl=en#, page CPUBound. I especially made short warmup (120 sec) and long run (2700sec) to see how different versions go through warmup stage. […]

Looking on 5.4 – IO bound benchmarks

With a lot of talks around 5.4 I decided to check how it works in our benchmarks. For first shoot I took tpcc-like IO-bound benchmark (100W, ~10GB of data, 3GB buffer_pool) and tested it on our Dell PowerEdge R900 box (16 cores, 32GB of RAM, RAID 10 on 8 SAS 2.5″ 15K RPM disks). For […]

TPC-H Run on MySQL 5.1 and 6.0

We were doing MySQL Performance evaluation on TPC-H queries for the client and they kindly allowed us to publish results which are very interesting. This is obviously not audited TPC-H run, and it can’t be because we used MyISAM tables which are not ACID complaint. Plus we only measured Power to keep things simple. We […]

MySQL Binaries availability

It looks like it looks like there are going a lot of discussions about future of MySQL Community Binaries, see for example this post and Kaj’s clarifications. Obviously now it grew to a lot of speculations and many comments are far from real story. It is also really interesting to watch MySQL try to balance […]

Paul McCullagh answers your questions about PBXT

Following on from our earlier announcement, Paul McCullagh has responded with the answers to your questions – as well as a few I gathered from other Percona folks, and attendees of OpenSQL Camp. Thank you Paul! What’s the “ideal” use case for the PBXT engine, and how does it compare in performance?  When would I […]

How innodb_open_files affects performance

Recently I looked at table_cache sizing which showed larger table cache does not always provides the best performance. So I decided to look at yet another similar variable – innodb_open_files which defines how many files Innodb will keep open while working in innodb_file_per_table mode. Unlike MyISAM Innodb does not have to keep open file descriptor […]

table_cache negative scalability

Couple of months ago there was a post by FreshBooks on getting great performance improvements by lowering table_cache variable. So I decided to investigate what is really happening here. The “common sense” approach to tuning caches is to get them as large as you can if you have enough resources (such as memory). With MySQL […]