April 23, 2014

How Percona does a MySQL Performance Audit

Our customers or prospective customers often ask us how we do a performance audit (it’s our most popular service). I thought I should write a blog post that will both answer their question, so I can just reply “read all about it at this URL” and share our methodology with readers a little bit. This […]

Getting real life query speeds with MySQL

To check for query performance improvements followed indexing/query changes or MySQL configuration changes our customers often decide to run the query and see if there is any significant improvement. Leaving aside question of checking single query alone might not be the best way to see real improvement for your application, the problem they usually run […]

How rows_sent can be more than rows_examined?

When looking at queries that are candidates for optimization I often recommend that people look at rows_sent and rows_examined values as available in the slow query log (as well as some other places). If rows_examined is by far larger than rows_sent, say 100 larger, then the query is a great candidate for optimization. Optimization could […]

Percona XtraDB Cluster: Setting up a simple cluster

Percona XtraDB Cluster (PXC) is different enough from async replication that it can be a bit of a puzzle how to do things the Galera way.  This post will attempt to illustrate the basics of setting up 2 node PXC cluster from scratch. Requirements Two servers (could be VMs) that can talk to each other. […]

How InnoDB promotes UNIQUE constraints

The other day I was running pt-duplicate-key-checker on behalf of a customer and noticed some peculiar recommendations on an InnoDB table with an odd structure (no PRIMARY key, but multiple UNIQUE constraints). This got me thinking about how InnoDB promotes UNIQUE constraints to the role of PRIMARY KEYs. The documentation is pretty clear: [DOCS] When […]

Getting Percona PAM to work with Percona Server & its client apps

Percona Server is bundled with the PAM plugin which opens a plethora of ways to authenticate to MySQL such as restricting time when users can connect to MySQL, authenticate via a USB key, authenticate to an external authentication system such as LDAP and many, many more PAM compatible mechanisms. If you want to use PAM […]

A case for MariaDB’s Hash Joins

MariaDB 5.3/5.5 has introduced a new join type “Hash Joins” which is an implementation of a Classic Block-based Hash Join Algorithm. In this post we will see what the Hash Join is, how it works and for what types of queries would it be the right choice. I will show the results of executing benchmarks […]

Connecting orphaned .ibd files

There are two ways InnoDB can organize tablespaces. First is when all data, indexes and system buffers are stored in a single tablespace. This is typicaly one or several ibdata files. A well known innodb_file_per_table option brings the second one. Tables and system areas are split into different files. Usually system tablespace is located in […]

Shard-Query EC2 images available

Infobright and InnoDB AMI images are now available There are now demonstration AMI images for Shard-Query. Each image comes pre-loaded with the data used in the previous Shard-Query blog post. The data in the each image is split into 20 “shards”. This blog post will refer to an EC2 instances as a node from here […]

The two even more fundamental performance metrics

In a recent blog post, I wrote about four fundamental metrics for system performance analysis. These are throughput, residence time, “weighted time” (the sum of all residence times in the observation period — the terminology is mine for lack of a better name), and concurrency. I derived all of these metrics from two “even more […]