August 1, 2014

Understanding the maximum number of columns in a MySQL table

This post was initially going to be two sets of polls: “What is the maximum number of columns in MySQL?” and “What is the minimum maximum number of columns in MySQL?”. Before you read on, ponder those questions and come up with your own answers… and see if you’re right or can prove me wrong! […]

Examining the TokuDB MySQL storage engine file structure

As we know different storage engines in MySQL have different file structures. Every table in MySQL 5.6 must have a .frm file in the database directory matching the table name. But where the rest of the data resides depends on the storage engine. For MyISAM we have .MYI and .MYD files in the database directory […]

Q&A: Even More Deadly Mistakes of MySQL Development

On Wednesday I gave a presentation on “How to Avoid Even More Common (but Deadly) MySQL Development Mistakes” for Percona MySQL Webinars.  If you missed it, you can still register to view the recording and my slides. Thanks to everyone who attended, and especially to folks who asked the great questions.  I answered as many as we had […]

Why %util number from iostat is meaningless for MySQL capacity planning

Earlier this month I wrote about vmstat iowait cpu numbers and some of the comments I got were advertising the use of util% as reported by the iostat tool instead. I find this number even more useless for MySQL performance tuning and capacity planning. Now let me start by saying this is a really tricky and deceptive number. Many […]

Getting to know TokuDB for MySQL

During last April’s Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo, TokuDB celebrated it’s first full-year as an open source storage engine. I still remember reading the official announcement and the expectations it created one year ago. The premises were very interesting as it had the potential of helping MySQL manage “big data” in a way InnoDB just […]

Do not trust vmstat IOwait numbers

I’ve been running a benchmark today on my old test box with conventional hard drives (no raid with BBU) and noticed something unusual in the CPU utilization statistics being reported. The benchmark was run like this:

Which means: create 64 threads and hammer the database with queries as quickly as possible. As the test […]

Parallel Query for MySQL with Shard-Query

While Shard-Query can work over multiple nodes, this blog post focuses on using Shard-Query with a single node.  Shard-Query can add parallelism to queries which use partitioned tables.  Very large tables can often be partitioned fairly easily. Shard-Query can leverage partitioning to add paralellism, because each partition can be queried independently. Because MySQL 5.6 supports the […]

Q&A: Common (but deadly) MySQL Development Mistakes

On Wednesday I gave a presentation on “How to Avoid Common (but Deadly) MySQL Development Mistakes” for Percona MySQL Webinars. If you missed it, you can still register to view the recording and my slides. Thanks to everyone who attended, and especially to folks who asked the great questions. I answered as many as we had time […]

How to monitor ALTER TABLE progress in MySQL

While working on a recent support issue as a Percona Support Engineer,  I got one question from a customer asking how to monitor ALTER TABLE progress. Actually, for MySQL 5.5 and prior versions, it’s quite difficult to ALTER the table in a running production environment especially for large tables (with millions records). Because it will rebuild and lock the table […]

Oracle’s Morgan Tocker opens up about MySQL development, MySQL 5.7

Today’s post features an interview with Morgan Tocker, MySQL community manager at Oracle. Morgan is an old friend of Percona, having worked here as director of MySQL training from 2009 to 2011. He’s also done stints at MySQL, Sun Microsystems and InPowered. You can follow his adventures at his blog, “Master MySQL.”  You can also […]