July 22, 2014

Why %util number from iostat is meaningless for MySQL capacity planning

Earlier this month I wrote about vmstat iowait cpu numbers and some of the comments I got were advertising the use of util% as reported by the iostat tool instead. I find this number even more useless for MySQL performance tuning and capacity planning. Now let me start by saying this is a really tricky and deceptive number. Many […]

Getting to know TokuDB for MySQL

During last April’s Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo, TokuDB celebrated it’s first full-year as an open source storage engine. I still remember reading the official announcement and the expectations it created one year ago. The premises were very interesting as it had the potential of helping MySQL manage “big data” in a way InnoDB just […]

A conversation with 5 Facebook MySQL gurus

Facebook, the undisputed king of online social networks, has 1.23 billion monthly active users collectively contributing to an ocean of data-intensive tasks – making the company one of the world’s top MySQL users. A small army of Facebook MySQL experts will be converging on Santa Clara, Calif. next week where several of them are leading […]

Tools and tips for analysis of MySQL’s Slow Query Log

MySQL has a nice feature, slow query log, which allows you to log all queries that exceed a predefined about of time to execute. Peter Zaitsev first wrote about this back in 2006 – there have been a few other posts here on the MySQL Performance Blog since then (check this and this, too) but […]

High-availability options for MySQL, October 2013 update

The technologies allowing to build highly-available (HA) MySQL solutions are in constant evolution and they cover very different needs and use cases. In order to help people choose the best HA solution for their needs, we decided, Jay Janssen and I, to publish, on a regular basis (hopefully, this is the first), an update on […]

Inexpensive SSDs for Database Workloads

The cost of SSDs has been dropping rapidly, and at the time of this writing, 2.5-drives have reached the 1TB capacity mark.  You can actually get inexpensive drives for as little as 60 cents per GB. Even inexpensive SSDs can perform tens of thousands of IOPs and come with 1.5M – 2M hous MTBF and […]

More on MySQL transaction descriptors optimization

Since my first post on MySQL transaction descriptors optimization introduced in Percona Server 5.5.30-30.2 and a followup by Dimitri Kravchuk, we have received a large number of questions on why the benchmark results in both posts look rather different. We were curious as well, so we tried to answer that question by retrying benchmarks on […]

How does MySQL Replication really work?

While we do have many blog posts on replication on our blog, such as on replication being single-threaded, on semi-synchronous replication or on estimating replication capacity, I don’t think we have one that covers the very basics of how MySQL replication really works on the high level. Or it’s been so long ago I can’t […]

Percona Replication Manager, a solution for MySQL high availability with replication using Pacemaker

The content of this article is outdated, look here for more up to date information. Over the last year, the frustration of many of us at Percona regarding issues with MMM has grown to a level where we started looking at other ways of achieving higher availability using MySQL replication. One of the weakness of […]

MySQL on Amazon RDS part 1: insert performance

Amazon’s Relational Database Service (RDS) is a cloud-hosted MySQL solution. I’ve had some clients hitting performance limitations on standard EC2 servers with EBS volumes (see SSD versus EBS death match), and one of them wanted to evaluate RDS as a replacement. It is built on the same technologies, but the hardware and networking are supposed […]