August 21, 2014

Row-based replication, MySQL 5.6 upgrades and temporal data types

Whither your rollback plan? MySQL 5.6 upgrades are in full swing these days and knowing how to safely upgrade from MySQL 5.5 to 5.6 is important. When upgrading a replication environment, it’s important that you can build a migration plan that safely allows for your upgrade with minimal risk — rollback is often a very […]

Calvin Sun on MySQL at Twitter, Percona Live 2014 and Facebook

Twitter’s Calvin Sun (@Calvinsun2012) is looking forward to the fast-approaching Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo this April 1-4 in Santa Clara, Calif. He’ll be speaking, yes, but he’s also looking forward to learning from his peers – particularly those at Facebook. Both companies, he explained, are in the rather unique positions of unprecedented rapid […]

Recovering temporal types in MySQL 5.6: TIME, TIMESTAMP and DATETIME

MySQL 5.6 introduces a new feature – microseconds resolution in some temporal types. As of 5.6.4 TIME, TIMESTAMP and DATETIME can have a fractional part. To create a field with subseconds you can specify precision in brackets: TIME(3), DATETIME(6) etc. Obviously, the new feature requires the format change. All three types may now have a […]

Understanding the maximum number of columns in a MySQL table

This post was initially going to be two sets of polls: “What is the maximum number of columns in MySQL?” and “What is the minimum maximum number of columns in MySQL?”. Before you read on, ponder those questions and come up with your own answers… and see if you’re right or can prove me wrong! […]

Recover BLOB fields

For a long time long types like BLOB, TEXT were not supported by Percona InnoDB Recovery Tool. The reason consists in a special way InnoDB stores BLOBs. An InnoDB table is stored in a clustered index called PRIMARY. It must exist even if a user hasn’t defined the primary index. The PRIMARY index pages are […]

Data Recovery Toolkit for InnoDB Version 0.1 Released

As Peter mentioned in one of previous posts, we’ve done huge work developing robust strategies of InnoDB data recovery to provide our customers effective data recovery services and one of major parts of these strategies is our toolkit for InnoDB data recovery. Today I’m proud to announce its first public release which was used to […]

InnoDB scalability issues due to tables without primary keys

Each day there is probably work done to improve performance of the InnoDB storage engine and remove bottlenecks and scalability issues. Hence there was another one I wanted to highlight: Scalability issues due to tables without primary keys This scalability issue is caused by the usage of tables without primary keys. This issue typically shows […]

The Optimization That (Often) Isn’t: Index Merge Intersection

Prior to version 5.0, MySQL could only use one index per table in a given query without any exceptions; folks that didn’t understand this limitation would often have tables with lots of single-column indexes on columns which commonly appeared in their WHERE clauses, and they’d wonder why the EXPLAIN plan for a given SELECT would […]

Timezone and pt-table-checksum

I recently worked through an issue with a client trying to detect data drift across some servers that were located in different timezones.  Unfortunately, several of the tables had timestamp fields and were set to a default value of CURRENT_TIMESTAMP.  From the manual, here is how MySQL handles timezone locality with timestamp fields: Values for TIMESTAMP columns are […]

Why you don’t want to shard.

Note: This blog post is part 1 of 4 on building our training workshop.

The Percona training workshop will not cover sharding. If you follow our blog, you’ll notice we don’t talk much about the subject; in some cases it makes sense, but in many we’ve seen that it causes architectures to be prematurely complicated.

So let me state it: You don’t want to shard.

Optimize everything else first, and then if performance still isn’t good enough, it’s time to take a very bitter medicine. The reason you need to shard basically comes down to one of these two reasons