April 24, 2014

Using the new spatial functions in MySQL 5.6 for geo-enabled applications

Geo-enabled (or location enabled) applications are very common nowadays and many of them use MySQL. The common tasks for such applications are: Find all points of interests (i.e. coffee shops) around (i.e. a 10 mile radius) the given location (latitude and longitude). For example we want to show this to a user of the mobile […]

MySQL-Memcached or NOSQL Tokyo Tyrant – part 1

All to often people force themselves into using a database like MySQL with no thought into whether if its the best solution to there problem. Why?  Because their other applications use it, so why not the new application?  Over the past couple of months I have been doing a ton of work for clients who […]

MySQL extensions for hosting

A few weeks ago I was asked to isolate some functionalities from Mark Callaghan’s MySQL patch bundle. They were extensions adding per-user and per-table accounting to the database, accessible with a new set of commands such as SHOW TABLE_STATISTICS, SHOW INDEX_STATISTICS and SHOW USER_STATISTICS. The first two can interest anyone to periodically check what data […]

Inexpensive SSDs for Database Workloads

The cost of SSDs has been dropping rapidly, and at the time of this writing, 2.5-drives have reached the 1TB capacity mark.  You can actually get inexpensive drives for as little as 60 cents per GB. Even inexpensive SSDs can perform tens of thousands of IOPs and come with 1.5M – 2M hous MTBF and […]

Sell-an-Elephant-to-your-Boss-HOWTO

Spoiler alert: If your boss does not need an elephant, he is definitely NOT going to buy one from you. If he will, he will regret it and eventually you will too. I must appologize to the reader who was expecting to find an advice on selling useless goods to his boss. While I do […]

Shard-Query EC2 images available

Infobright and InnoDB AMI images are now available There are now demonstration AMI images for Shard-Query. Each image comes pre-loaded with the data used in the previous Shard-Query blog post. The data in the each image is split into 20 “shards”. This blog post will refer to an EC2 instances as a node from here […]

Where does HandlerSocket really save you time?

HandlerSocket has really generated a lot of interest because of the dual promises of ease-of-use and blazing-fast performance. The performance comes from eliminating CPU consumption. Akira Higuchi’s HandlerSocket presentation from a couple of months back had some really good profile results for libmysql versus libhsclient (starting at slide 15). Somebody in the audience at Percona […]

Is VoltDB really as scalable as they claim?

Before I begin, a disclaimer. VoltDB is not a customer, and did not pay Percona or me to investigate VoltDB’s scalability or publish this blog post. More disclaimers at the end. Short version: VoltDB is very scalable; it should scale to 120 partitions, 39 servers, and 1.6 million complex transactions per second at over 300 […]

Is there benefit from having more memory ?

My post back in April, http://www.mysqlperformanceblog.com/2010/04/08/fast-ssd-or-more-memory/, caused quite interest, especially on topic SSD vs Memory. That time I used fairy small dataset, so it caused more questions, like, should we have more then 128GB of memory? If we use fast solid state drive, should we still be looking to increase memory, or that configuration provides […]

Query Response time histogram – new feature in Percona Server

Recently we had couple posts dedicated to performance monitoring, i.e. Color code your performance numbers, Performance Optimization and Six Sigma, so you may understand we consider stability of performance numbers as one of important area for database management. That’s why we decided to add histogram of queries response times into Percona Server, and our software […]