July 24, 2014

Impact of memory allocators on MySQL performance

MySQL server intensively uses dynamic memory allocation so a good choice of memory allocator is quite important for the proper utilization of CPU/RAM resources. Efficient memory allocator should help to improve scalability, increase throughput and keep memory footprint under the control. In this post I’m going to check impact of several memory allocators on the […]

An update on Percona Live MySQL Conference & Expo 2012

We announced a while back that we were going to continue the traditional MySQL conference in Santa Clara, because O’Reilly wasn’t doing it anymore. But we haven’t given an update in a while. Here’s the current status: We created a conference committee. We created a conference website that allows people to create an account and […]

Getting MySQL Core file on Linux

Core file can be quite helpful to troubleshoot MySQL Crashes yet it is not always easy to get, especially with recent Linux distributions which have security features to prevent core files to be dumped by setuid processes (and MySQL Server is most commonly ran changing user from “root” to “mysql”). Before you embark on enabling […]

MySQL performance on EC2/EBS versus RDS

A while ago I started a series of posts showing benchmark results on Amazon EC2 servers with RAID’ed EBS volumes and MySQL, versus RDS machines. For reasons that won’t add anything to this discussion, I got sidetracked, and then time passed, and I no longer think it’s a good idea to publish those blog posts […]

What’s required to tune MySQL?

I got a serendipitous call (thanks!) yesterday asking what would be needed to tune[1] a database for better performance. It is a question that I hear often, but I never thought about answering it in public. Here’s a consolidated version of what I explained during our conversation.

Impact of the number of idle connections in MySQL (version 2)

Last Friday I published results of DBT2 performance while varying the number of idle connections here, but I had compiled MySQL with the debugging code enabled. That completely screw up my results, be aware… debug options have a huge performance impact. So, I recompiled Percona-Server 11.2 without the debug options and did another benchmark run. […]

MySQL-Memcached or NOSQL Tokyo Tyrant – part 2

Part 1 of our series set-up our “test”  application and looked at boosting performance of the application by buffer MySQL with memcached.  Our test application is simple and requires only 3 basic operations per transaction 2 reads and 1 write.  Using memcached combined with MySQL we ended up nearly getting a 10X performance boost from […]

Impact of logging on MySQL’s performance

Introduction When people think about Percona’s microslow patch immediately a question arises how much logging impacts on performance. When we do performance audit often we log every query to find not only slow queries. A query may take less than a second to execute, but a huge number of such queries may significantly load a […]

How Percona does a MySQL Performance Audit

Our customers or prospective customers often ask us how we do a performance audit (it’s our most popular service). I thought I should write a blog post that will both answer their question, so I can just reply “read all about it at this URL” and share our methodology with readers a little bit. This […]

How to improve InnoDB performance by 55% for write-bound loads

During April’s Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo 2014, I attended a talk on MySQL 5.7 performance an scalability given by Dimitri Kravtchuk, the Oracle MySQL benchmark specialist. He mentioned at some point that the InnoDB double write buffer was a real performance killer. For the ones that don’t know what the innodb double write […]