April 18, 2014

InnoDB file formats: Here is one pitfall to avoid

UPDATED: explaining the role of innodb_strict_mode and correcting introduction of innodb_file_format Compressed tables is an example of an InnoDB feature that became available with the Barracuda file format, introduced in the InnoDB plugin. They can bring significant gains in raw performance and scalability: given the data is stored in a compressed format the amount of […]

The use of Iptables ClusterIP target as a load balancer for PXC, PRM, MHA and NDB

Most technologies achieving high-availability for MySQL need a load-balancer to spread the client connections to a valid database host, even the Tungsten special connector can be seen as a sophisticated load-balancer. People often use hardware load balancer or software solution like haproxy. In both cases, in order to avoid having a single point of failure, […]

How to recover table structure from .frm files with MySQL Utilities

Table structures are stored in .frm files and in the InnoDB Data Dictionary. Sometimes, usually in data recovery issues, we need to recover those structures to be able to find the lost data or just to recreate the tables. There are different ways to do it and we’ve already written about it in this blog. […]

MySQL 5.7.3 milestone release fixes some of my pet peeves

It is wonderful to see some of my original pet peeves fixed in MySQL 5.7.3! It has not even taken 10 years I remember when starting my work at MySQL Support that I would recommend using UNION ALL instead of plain UNION because it would not require duplicate elimination, and as such, would not require […]

MySQL Error: Too many connections

We have always received quite few questions here at Percona Support on how to avoid the dreaded “Too many connections” error, as well as what is the recommended value for max_connections. So, in this article I will try to cover best possible answers to these questions so others can mitigate similar kinds of issues. My […]

Innotop: A real-time, advanced investigation tool for MySQL

GUI monitoring tools for MySQL are not always suitable for all our needs or situations. Most of them are designed to provide historical views into what happens to our database over time rather then real-time insight into current MySQL server status. Excellent free tools for this include Cacti, Zabbix, Ganglia, Nagios, etc. But each of […]

SSL Performance Overhead in MySQL

NOTE: This is part 1 of what will be a two-part series on the performance implications of using in-flight data encryption. Some of you may recall my security webinar from back in mid-August; one of the follow-up questions that I was asked was about the performance impact of enabling SSL connections. My answer was 25%, […]

Tuning MySQL 5.6 configuration – Webinar followup

We had a wonderful time during the Sept. 25 webinar, “MySQL 5.6 Configuration Optimization,” and I got a lot more questions than I could answer during the hour. So here is a followup with answers to the most interesting questions you guys asked. (You can also watch a recording of entire webinar here.) Q: What […]

How can we bring query to the data?

Baron recently wrote about sending the query to the data looking at distributed systems like Cassandra. I want to take a look at more simple systems like MySQL and see how we’re doing in this space. It is obvious getting computations as closer to the data as possible is the most efficient as we will […]

Inexpensive SSDs for Database Workloads

The cost of SSDs has been dropping rapidly, and at the time of this writing, 2.5-drives have reached the 1TB capacity mark.  You can actually get inexpensive drives for as little as 60 cents per GB. Even inexpensive SSDs can perform tens of thousands of IOPs and come with 1.5M – 2M hous MTBF and […]