August 23, 2014

InnoDB scalability issues due to tables without primary keys

Each day there is probably work done to improve performance of the InnoDB storage engine and remove bottlenecks and scalability issues. Hence there was another one I wanted to highlight: Scalability issues due to tables without primary keys This scalability issue is caused by the usage of tables without primary keys. This issue typically shows […]

Innotop: A real-time, advanced investigation tool for MySQL

GUI monitoring tools for MySQL are not always suitable for all our needs or situations. Most of them are designed to provide historical views into what happens to our database over time rather then real-time insight into current MySQL server status. Excellent free tools for this include Cacti, Zabbix, Ganglia, Nagios, etc. But each of […]

Percona Monitoring Plugins 1.0.5 release for MySQL

Percona is glad to announce the release of Percona Monitoring Plugins 1.0.5 for MySQL. The components are designed to integrate seamlessly with widely deployed solutions such as Nagios and Cacti, and are delivered in the form of templates, plugins, and scripts. Changelog: * Added mysql-ca option to ss_get_mysql_stats.php (bug 1213857) * Added user info to […]

Tuning MySQL 5.6 configuration – Webinar followup

We had a wonderful time during the Sept. 25 webinar, “MySQL 5.6 Configuration Optimization,” and I got a lot more questions than I could answer during the hour. So here is a followup with answers to the most interesting questions you guys asked. (You can also watch a recording of entire webinar here.) Q: What […]

How to reclaim space in InnoDB when innodb_file_per_table is ON

When innodb_file_per_table is OFF and all data is going to be stored in ibdata files. If you drop some tables of delete some data then there is no any other way to reclaim that unused disk space except dump/reload method. When Innodb_file_per_table is ON, each table stores data and indexes in it’s own tablespace file. […]

Here’s my favorite secret MySQL 5.6 feature. What’s yours?

MySQL 5.6 has a great many new features, including, but certainly not limited to a number of performance improvements. However, besides the widely talked-about features such as InnoDB support for full text search, optimizer, performance schema improvements and GTID, there are also a few tiny improvements that nobody cared to mention. One such feature is…

Running MySQL 5.6 on Amazon RDS: Webinar followup questions answered

Thanks to everyone who attended last week’s webinar, Running MySQL 5.6 on Amazon RDS.” If you weren’t able to attend, the recording and slides are available for viewing/download (or, if you were able to attend and just want to see it again). I’ve also answered the questions I didn’t have a chance to field during […]

Crash-resistant replication: How to avoid MySQL replication errors

Percona Server’s “crash-resistant replication” feature is useful in versions 5.1 through 5.5. However, in Percona Server 5.6 it’s replaced with Oracle MySQL 5.6′s “crash safe replication” feature, which has it’s own implementation (you can read more about it here). A MySQL slave normally stores its position in files master.info and relay-log.info which are updated by […]

Schema changes – what’s new in MySQL 5.6?

Among many of the improvements you can enjoy in MySQL 5.6, there is one that addresses a huge operational problem that most DBAs and System Administrators encounter in their life: schema changes. While it is usually not a problem for small tables or those in early stages of product life cycle, schema changes become a […]

tpcc-mysql: Simple usage steps and how to build graphs with gnuplot

Lots of times we could see different benchmarks performed by tpcc-mysql. So today I want to tell you about how to use tpcc-mysql and how to build graphs with gnuplot in a few easy steps. As an example I’ll compare Percona Server 5.5 (latest version: 5.5.31) performance by changing InnoDB buffer pool size: innodb_buffer_pool_size = […]