April 18, 2014

A conversation with 5 Facebook MySQL gurus

Facebook, the undisputed king of online social networks, has 1.23 billion monthly active users collectively contributing to an ocean of data-intensive tasks – making the company one of the world’s top MySQL users. A small army of Facebook MySQL experts will be converging on Santa Clara, Calif. next week where several of them are leading […]

Q&A: Common (but deadly) MySQL Development Mistakes

On Wednesday I gave a presentation on “How to Avoid Common (but Deadly) MySQL Development Mistakes” for Percona MySQL Webinars. If you missed it, you can still register to view the recording and my slides. Thanks to everyone who attended, and especially to folks who asked the great questions. I answered as many as we had time […]

How to monitor ALTER TABLE progress in MySQL

While working on a recent support issue as a Percona Support Engineer,  I got one question from a customer asking how to monitor ALTER TABLE progress. Actually, for MySQL 5.5 and prior versions, it’s quite difficult to ALTER the table in a running production environment especially for large tables (with millions records). Because it will rebuild and lock the table […]

Multiple column index vs multiple indexes with MySQL 5.6

A question often comes when talking about indexing: should we use multiple column indexes or multiple indexes on single columns? Peter Zaitsev wrote about it back in 2008 and the conclusion then was that a multiple column index is most often the best solution. But with all the recent optimizer improvements, is there anything different with […]

High-availability options for MySQL, October 2013 update

The technologies allowing to build highly-available (HA) MySQL solutions are in constant evolution and they cover very different needs and use cases. In order to help people choose the best HA solution for their needs, we decided, Jay Janssen and I, to publish, on a regular basis (hopefully, this is the first), an update on […]

Designing one to many relations – MongoDB vs MySQL

We already discussed one to one relations in MongoDB, and the main conclusion was that you should design your collections according to the most frequent access pattern. With one to many relations, this is still valid, but other factors may come into play. Let’s look at a simple problem: we are a shop and we […]

Using the new spatial functions in MySQL 5.6 for geo-enabled applications

Geo-enabled (or location enabled) applications are very common nowadays and many of them use MySQL. The common tasks for such applications are: Find all points of interests (i.e. coffee shops) around (i.e. a 10 mile radius) the given location (latitude and longitude). For example we want to show this to a user of the mobile […]

InnoDB scalability issues due to tables without primary keys

Each day there is probably work done to improve performance of the InnoDB storage engine and remove bottlenecks and scalability issues. Hence there was another one I wanted to highlight: Scalability issues due to tables without primary keys This scalability issue is caused by the usage of tables without primary keys. This issue typically shows […]

Tuning MySQL 5.6 configuration – Webinar followup

We had a wonderful time during the Sept. 25 webinar, “MySQL 5.6 Configuration Optimization,” and I got a lot more questions than I could answer during the hour. So here is a followup with answers to the most interesting questions you guys asked. (You can also watch a recording of entire webinar here.) Q: What […]

How to reclaim space in InnoDB when innodb_file_per_table is ON

When innodb_file_per_table is OFF and all data is going to be stored in ibdata files. If you drop some tables of delete some data then there is no any other way to reclaim that unused disk space except dump/reload method. When Innodb_file_per_table is ON, each table stores data and indexes in it’s own tablespace file. […]