April 21, 2014

InnoDB performance optimization basics (redux)

I recently stumbled upon a post that Peter Zaitsev published back in 2007 titled “Innodb Performance Optimization Basics.” It’s a great post and reading it inspired me to examine what’s changed in the nearly six years that have followed in terms of MySQL, Percona Server – as well as in all of the other now-available […]

A case for MariaDB’s Hash Joins

MariaDB 5.3/5.5 has introduced a new join type “Hash Joins” which is an implementation of a Classic Block-based Hash Join Algorithm. In this post we will see what the Hash Join is, how it works and for what types of queries would it be the right choice. I will show the results of executing benchmarks […]

Aligning IO on a hard disk RAID – the Theory

Now that flash storage is becoming more popular, IO alignment question keeps popping up more often than it used to when all we had were rotating hard disk drives. I think the reason is very simple – when systems only had one bearing hard disk drive (HDD) as in RAID1 or one disk drive at […]

Introducing our Percona Live speakers

We have mostly finalized the Percona Live schedule at this point, and I thought I’d take a few minutes to introduce who’s going to be speaking and what they’ll cover. A brief explanation first: we’ve personally recruited the speakers, which is why it has been a slow process to finalize and get abstracts on the […]

InnoDB, InnoDB-plugin vs XtraDB on fast storage

To continue fun with FusionIO cards, I wanted to check how MySQL / InnoDB performs here. For benchmark I took MySQL 5.1.42 with built-in InnoDB, InnoDB-plugin 1.0.6, and XtraDB 1.0.6-9 ( InnoDB with Percona patches). As benchmark engine I used tpcc-mysql with 1000 warehouses ( which gives around 90GB of data + indexes) on my […]

Fix of InnoDB/XtraDB scalability of rollback segment

Recently I wrote about InnoDB scalability on 24-core box, and we made research of scalability problems in sysbench write workload (benchmark emulates intensive insert/delete queries). By our results the problem is in concurrency on rollback segment, which by default is single and all transactions are serialized accessing to segment. Fortunately InnoDB internally has mechanism to […]

Using LoadAvg for Performance Optimization

Linux and Unixes have excellent metric of system load called “loadavg”. In fact load average is is 3 numbers which correspond to “load average” calculated for one five and 15 minutes. It is computed as exponential moving average so most recent load have more weight in the value than old one. What does Load Average […]

Sysbench evaluation of iSCSI performance

Partha Dutta posted pretty interesting post about iSCSI vs SCSI performance using SysBench. This is nice to finally see some iSCSI benchmarks done with MySQL – something we were planning to do for a while but never ended up doing, mainly due to lack of hardware available for tests. It is also good to see […]

How reliable RAID really is

This post is not exactly about MySQL Performance or about Performance at all, but I guess it should be interested to many MySQL DBAs and other people involved running MySQL In production. Recently I’ve been involved in troubleshooting Dell Poweredge 2850 system running RAID5 using 6GB internal hard drives, which give about 1.4TB of usable […]

InnoDB thread concurrency

InnoDB has a mechanism to regulate count of threads working inside InnoDB. innodb_thread_concurrency is variable which set this count, and there are two friendly variables innodb_thread_sleep_delay and innodb_concurrency_tickets. I’ll try to explain how it works. MySQL has pluginable architecture which divides work between mysql common code (parser, optimizer) and storage engine. From storage engine’s point […]