August 23, 2014

Why %util number from iostat is meaningless for MySQL capacity planning

Earlier this month I wrote about vmstat iowait cpu numbers and some of the comments I got were advertising the use of util% as reported by the iostat tool instead. I find this number even more useless for MySQL performance tuning and capacity planning. Now let me start by saying this is a really tricky and deceptive number. Many […]

Using MySQL 5.6 Performance Schema in multi-tenant environments

Hosting a shared MySQL instance for your internal or external clients (“multi-tenant”) was always a challenge. Multi-tenants approach or a “schema-per-customer” approach is pretty common nowadays to host multiple clients on the same MySQL sever. One of issues of this approach, however, is the lack of visibility: it is hard to tell how many resources (queries, disk, […]

Do not trust vmstat IOwait numbers

I’ve been running a benchmark today on my old test box with conventional hard drives (no raid with BBU) and noticed something unusual in the CPU utilization statistics being reported. The benchmark was run like this:

Which means: create 64 threads and hammer the database with queries as quickly as possible. As the test […]

Q&A: Common (but deadly) MySQL Development Mistakes

On Wednesday I gave a presentation on “How to Avoid Common (but Deadly) MySQL Development Mistakes” for Percona MySQL Webinars. If you missed it, you can still register to view the recording and my slides. Thanks to everyone who attended, and especially to folks who asked the great questions. I answered as many as we had time […]

PERFORMANCE_SCHEMA vs Slow Query Log

A couple of weeks ago, shortly after Vadim wrote about Percona Cloud Tools and using Slow Query Log to capture the data, Mark Leith asked why don’t we just use Performance Schema instead? This is an interesting question and I think it deserves its own blog post to talk about. First, I would say main […]

Innotop: A real-time, advanced investigation tool for MySQL

GUI monitoring tools for MySQL are not always suitable for all our needs or situations. Most of them are designed to provide historical views into what happens to our database over time rather then real-time insight into current MySQL server status. Excellent free tools for this include Cacti, Zabbix, Ganglia, Nagios, etc. But each of […]

SSL Performance Overhead in MySQL

NOTE: This is part 1 of what will be a two-part series on the performance implications of using in-flight data encryption. Some of you may recall my security webinar from back in mid-August; one of the follow-up questions that I was asked was about the performance impact of enabling SSL connections. My answer was 25%, […]

Big Data with MySQL and Hadoop at MySQL Connect 2013

I will be talking about Big Data with MySQL and Hadoop at MySQL Connect 2013 (Sept. 21-22) in San Francisco as well as at Percona University at Washington, DC (September 12, 2013). Apache Hadoop is a very popular Big Data solution and we can nowadays easily integrate it with MySQL. I will start with a brief introduction […]

Schema changes – what’s new in MySQL 5.6?

Among many of the improvements you can enjoy in MySQL 5.6, there is one that addresses a huge operational problem that most DBAs and System Administrators encounter in their life: schema changes. While it is usually not a problem for small tables or those in early stages of product life cycle, schema changes become a […]

More on MySQL transaction descriptors optimization

Since my first post on MySQL transaction descriptors optimization introduced in Percona Server 5.5.30-30.2 and a followup by Dimitri Kravchuk, we have received a large number of questions on why the benchmark results in both posts look rather different. We were curious as well, so we tried to answer that question by retrying benchmarks on […]