April 20, 2014

How to monitor ALTER TABLE progress in MySQL

While working on a recent support issue as a Percona Support Engineer,  I got one question from a customer asking how to monitor ALTER TABLE progress. Actually, for MySQL 5.5 and prior versions, it’s quite difficult to ALTER the table in a running production environment especially for large tables (with millions records). Because it will rebuild and lock the table […]

MySQL 5.7.3 milestone release fixes some of my pet peeves

It is wonderful to see some of my original pet peeves fixed in MySQL 5.7.3! It has not even taken 10 years I remember when starting my work at MySQL Support that I would recommend using UNION ALL instead of plain UNION because it would not require duplicate elimination, and as such, would not require […]

Designing one to many relations – MongoDB vs MySQL

We already discussed one to one relations in MongoDB, and the main conclusion was that you should design your collections according to the most frequent access pattern. With one to many relations, this is still valid, but other factors may come into play. Let’s look at a simple problem: we are a shop and we […]

Using the new spatial functions in MySQL 5.6 for geo-enabled applications

Geo-enabled (or location enabled) applications are very common nowadays and many of them use MySQL. The common tasks for such applications are: Find all points of interests (i.e. coffee shops) around (i.e. a 10 mile radius) the given location (latitude and longitude). For example we want to show this to a user of the mobile […]

Another reason why SQL_SLAVE_SKIP_COUNTER is bad in MySQL

It is everywhere in the world of MySQL that if your replication is broken because an event caused a duplicate key or a row was not found and it cannot be updated or deleted, then you can use ‘ STOP SLAVE; SET GLOBAL SQL_SLAVE_SKIP_COUNTER=1; START SLAVE; ’ and be done with it. In some cases this is fine and you can repair the […]

What kind of queries are bad for MySQL?

In writing a recommendation for our Web development team on how to use MySQL, I came up with the following list, which I want to share: What kind of queries are bad for MySQL? Any query is bad. Send a query only if you must. (Hint: use caching like memcache or redis) Queries that examine […]

Crash-resistant replication: How to avoid MySQL replication errors

Percona Server’s “crash-resistant replication” feature is useful in versions 5.1 through 5.5. However, in Percona Server 5.6 it’s replaced with Oracle MySQL 5.6′s “crash safe replication” feature, which has it’s own implementation (you can read more about it here). A MySQL slave normally stores its position in files master.info and relay-log.info which are updated by […]

Schema changes – what’s new in MySQL 5.6?

Among many of the improvements you can enjoy in MySQL 5.6, there is one that addresses a huge operational problem that most DBAs and System Administrators encounter in their life: schema changes. While it is usually not a problem for small tables or those in early stages of product life cycle, schema changes become a […]

InnoDB Full-text Search in MySQL 5.6: Part 2, The Queries!

This is part 2 in a 3 part series. In part 1, we took a quick look at some initial configuration of InnoDB full-text search and discovered a little bit of quirky behavior; here, we are going to run some queries and compare the result sets. Our hope is that the one of two things […]

InnoDB Full-text Search in MySQL 5.6 (part 1)

I’ve never been a very big fan of MyISAM; I would argue that in most situations, any possible advantages to using MyISAM are far outweighed by the potential disadvantages and the strengths of InnoDB. However, up until MySQL 5.6, MyISAM was the only storage engine with support for full-text search (FTS). And I’ve encountered many […]