April 17, 2014

Designing one to many relations – MongoDB vs MySQL

We already discussed one to one relations in MongoDB, and the main conclusion was that you should design your collections according to the most frequent access pattern. With one to many relations, this is still valid, but other factors may come into play. Let’s look at a simple problem: we are a shop and we […]

Tuning MySQL 5.6 configuration – Webinar followup

We had a wonderful time during the Sept. 25 webinar, “MySQL 5.6 Configuration Optimization,” and I got a lot more questions than I could answer during the hour. So here is a followup with answers to the most interesting questions you guys asked. (You can also watch a recording of entire webinar here.) Q: What […]

Why is the ibdata1 file continuously growing in MySQL?

We receive this question about the ibdata1 file in MySQL very often in Percona Support. The panic starts when the monitoring server sends an alert about the storage of the MySQL server – saying that the disk is about to get filled. After some research you realize that most of the disk space is used […]

Another reason why SQL_SLAVE_SKIP_COUNTER is bad in MySQL

It is everywhere in the world of MySQL that if your replication is broken because an event caused a duplicate key or a row was not found and it cannot be updated or deleted, then you can use ‘ STOP SLAVE; SET GLOBAL SQL_SLAVE_SKIP_COUNTER=1; START SLAVE; ’ and be done with it. In some cases this is fine and you can repair the […]

What kind of queries are bad for MySQL?

In writing a recommendation for our Web development team on how to use MySQL, I came up with the following list, which I want to share: What kind of queries are bad for MySQL? Any query is bad. Send a query only if you must. (Hint: use caching like memcache or redis) Queries that examine […]

Crash-resistant replication: How to avoid MySQL replication errors

Percona Server’s “crash-resistant replication” feature is useful in versions 5.1 through 5.5. However, in Percona Server 5.6 it’s replaced with Oracle MySQL 5.6′s “crash safe replication” feature, which has it’s own implementation (you can read more about it here). A MySQL slave normally stores its position in files master.info and relay-log.info which are updated by […]

Schema changes – what’s new in MySQL 5.6?

Among many of the improvements you can enjoy in MySQL 5.6, there is one that addresses a huge operational problem that most DBAs and System Administrators encounter in their life: schema changes. While it is usually not a problem for small tables or those in early stages of product life cycle, schema changes become a […]

tpcc-mysql: Simple usage steps and how to build graphs with gnuplot

Lots of times we could see different benchmarks performed by tpcc-mysql. So today I want to tell you about how to use tpcc-mysql and how to build graphs with gnuplot in a few easy steps. As an example I’ll compare Percona Server 5.5 (latest version: 5.5.31) performance by changing InnoDB buffer pool size: innodb_buffer_pool_size = […]

The small improvements of MySQL 5.6: Duplicate Index Detection

Here at the MySQL Performance Blog, we’ve been discussing the several new features that MySQL 5.6 brought: GTID-based replication, InnoDB Fulltext, Memcached integration, a more complete performance schema, online DDL and several other InnoDB and query optimizer improvements. However, I plan to focus on a series of posts on the small but handy improvements – […]

MySQL and the SSB – Part 2 – MyISAM vs InnoDB low concurrency

This blog post is part two in what is now a continuing series on the Star Schema Benchmark. In my previous blog post I compared MySQL 5.5.30 to MySQL 5.6.10, both with default settings using only the InnoDB storage engine.  In my testing I discovered that innodb_old_blocks_time had an effect on performance of the benchmark.  There was […]