April 19, 2014

The MySQL ARCHIVE storage engine – Alternatives

In my previous post I pointed out that the existing ARCHIVE storage engine in MySQL may not be the one that will satisfy your needs when it comes to effectively storing large and/or old data. But are there any good alternatives? As the primary purpose of this engine is to store rarely accessed data in disk […]

Analyzing WordPress MySQL queries with Query Analytics

This blog, MySQLPerformanceBlog.com, is powered by WordPress, but we never really looked into what kind of queries to MySQL are used by WordPress. So for couple months we ran a Query Analytics (part of Percona Cloud Tools) agent there, and now it is interesting to take a look on queries. Query Analytics uses reports produced […]

How to recover table structure from .frm files with MySQL Utilities

Table structures are stored in .frm files and in the InnoDB Data Dictionary. Sometimes, usually in data recovery issues, we need to recover those structures to be able to find the lost data or just to recreate the tables. There are different ways to do it and we’ve already written about it in this blog. […]

How to recover an orphaned .ibd file with MySQL 5.6

A few years ago Yves Trudeau and Aleksandr Kuzminsky wrote posts about different ways for recovering orphaned .ibd files: Connecting orphaned .ibd files A recovery trivia or how to recover from a lost ibdata1 file Today I want to show you how to do that in more easy and quick way. In my example I’ll […]

Designing one to many relations – MongoDB vs MySQL

We already discussed one to one relations in MongoDB, and the main conclusion was that you should design your collections according to the most frequent access pattern. With one to many relations, this is still valid, but other factors may come into play. Let’s look at a simple problem: we are a shop and we […]

Schema changes – what’s new in MySQL 5.6?

Among many of the improvements you can enjoy in MySQL 5.6, there is one that addresses a huge operational problem that most DBAs and System Administrators encounter in their life: schema changes. While it is usually not a problem for small tables or those in early stages of product life cycle, schema changes become a […]

MySQL 5.6 vs MySQL 5.5 and the Star Schema Benchmark

So far most of the benchmarks posted about MySQL 5.6 use the sysbench OLTP workload.  I wanted to test a set of queries which, unlike sysbench, utilize joins.  I also wanted an easily reproducible set of data which is more rich than the simple sysbench table.  The Star Schema Benchmark (SSB) seems ideal for this. […]

High-Performance Click Analysis with MySQL

We have a lot of customers who do click analysis, site analytics, search engine marketing, online advertising, user behavior analysis, and many similar types of work.  The first thing these have in common is that they’re generally some kind of loggable event. The next characteristic of a lot of these systems (real or planned) is […]

Performance gotcha of MySQL memory tables

One performance gotcha with MEMORY tables you might know about comes from the fact it is the only MySQL storage engine which defaults to HASH index type by default, instead of BTREE which makes indexes unusable for prefix matches or range lookups. This is however not performance gotcha I’m going to write about. There is […]

MySQL: Followup on UNION for query optimization, Query profiling

Few days ago I wrote an article about using UNION to implement loose index scan. First I should mention double IN also works same way so you do not have to use the union. So changing query to:

So as you see there are really different types of ranges in MySQL. IN range allows […]