August 1, 2014

How to Extract All Running Queries (Including the Last Executed Statement) from a Core File?

This post builds on the How to obtain the “LES” (Last Executed Statement) from an Optimized Core Dump? post written about a year ago. A day after that post was released, Shane Bester wrote an improved version, How to obtain all executing queries from a core file on his blog. Reading that post is key […]

How to obtain the “LES” (Last Executed Statement) from an Optimized Core Dump?

Ever ran into a situation where you saw “some important variable you really needed to know about=<optimized out>” while debugging?

Getting MySQL Core file on Linux

Core file can be quite helpful to troubleshoot MySQL Crashes yet it is not always easy to get, especially with recent Linux distributions which have security features to prevent core files to be dumped by setuid processes (and MySQL Server is most commonly ran changing user from “root” to “mysql”). Before you embark on enabling […]

Modeling InnoDB Scalability on Multi-Core Servers

Mat Keep’s blog post on InnoDB-vs-MyISAM benchmarks that Oracle recently published prompted me to do some mathematical modeling of InnoDB’s scalability as the number of cores in the server increases. Vadim runs lots of benchmarks that measure what happens under increasing concurrency while holding the hardware constant, but not as many with varying numbers of […]

MySQL Limitations Part 4: One thread per connection

This is the third in a series on what’s seriously limiting MySQL in core use cases (links: part 1, 2, 3). This post is about the way MySQL handles connections, allocating one thread per connection to the server.

XtraDB/InnoDB CPU bound benchmarks on 24cores server

One of our customers gave me a chance to run some benchmarks on 24-core (intel cpu based) server, and I could not miss it and ran few CPU-bound tasks there. The goal of benchmarks was investigation of InnoDB-plugin and XtraDB scalability in CPU-bound load.

Thoughts on MySQL Replication

Brian Aker recently published good write up about using MySQL replication. The piece I find missing however is good description of warning about limits of this approach as well as things you need to watch out for. You can call me person with negative mind but I tend to think about limits as well. So […]

Reference architecture for a write-intensive MySQL deployment

We designed Percona Cloud Tools (both hardware and software setup) to handle a very high-intensive MySQL write workload. For example, we already observe inserts of 1bln+ datapoints per day. So I wanted to share what kind of hardware we use to achieve this result. Let me describe what we use, and later I will explain […]

Failover with the MySQL Utilities: Part 2 – mysqlfailover

In the previous post of this series we saw how you could use mysqlrpladmin to perform manual failover/switchover when GTID replication is enabled in MySQL 5.6. Now we will review mysqlfailover (version 1.4.3), another tool from the MySQL Utilities that can be used for automatic failover. Summary mysqlfailover can perform automatic failover if MySQL 5.6′s […]

Sysbench Benchmarking of Tesora’s Database Virtualization Engine

Tesora, previously called Parelastic, asked Percona to do a sysbench benchmark evaluation of its Database Virtualization Engine on specific architectures on Amazon EC2. The focus of Tesora is to provide a scalable Database As A Service platform for OpenStack. The Database Virtualization Engine (DVE) plays a part in this as it aims at allowing databases […]