August 20, 2014

How to convert MySQL’s SHOW PROFILES into a real profile

SHOW PROFILES shows how much time MySQL spends in various phases of query execution, but it isn’t a full-featured profile. By that, I mean that it doesn’t show similar phases aggregated together, doesn’t sort them by worst-first, and doesn’t show the relative amount of time consumed. I’ll profile the “nicer_but_slower_film_list” included with the Sakila sample […]

Beware the Innodb Table Monitor

As I stated in my last post, I decided to use the Innodb Table monitor to diagnose an Index count mismatch error a customers found in their mysqld.err log to verify if the problem still existed. The Innodb Table Monitor has existed for basically forever in Innodb (the MySQL manual discusses it back in the 4.1 […]

Improved InnoDB fast index creation

One of the serious limitations in the fast index creation feature introduced in the InnoDB plugin is that it only works when indexes are explicitly created using ALTER TABLE or CREATE INDEX. Peter has already blogged about it before, here I’ll just briefly reiterate other cases that might benefit from that feature: when ALTER TABLE […]

Performance problem with Innodb and DROP TABLE

I’ve been working with an application which does a lot of CREATE and DROP table for Innodb tables and we’ve discovered DROP TABLE can take a lot of time and when it happens a lot of other threads stall in “Opening Tables” State. Also contrary to my initial suspect benchmarking create/drop table was CPU bound […]

More on table_cache

In my previous post I looked into how large table_cache actually can decrease performance. The “miss” path is getting more expensive very quickly as table cache growths so if you’re going to have high miss ratio anyway you’re better off with small table cache. What I have not checked though is how does table_cache (or […]

Paul McCullagh answers your questions about PBXT

Following on from our earlier announcement, Paul McCullagh has responded with the answers to your questions – as well as a few I gathered from other Percona folks, and attendees of OpenSQL Camp. Thank you Paul! What’s the “ideal” use case for the PBXT engine, and how does it compare in performance?  When would I […]

Slow DROP TABLE

It is a known fact that ext3 is not the most efficient file system out there and for example file removals can be painfully slow and cause a lot of random I/O. However, as it turns out, it can sometimes have a much more severe impact on the MySQL performance that it would seem. When […]

What is the longest part of Innodb Recovery Process ?

In MySQL 4.1 and above the longest part of recovery after crash for Innodb tables could be UNDO stage – it was happening in foreground and was basically unbound – if you have large enough transaction which needed to be undone this could take long hours. REDO stage on other hand always could be regulated […]

What to tune in MySQL Server after installation

My favorite question during Interview for people to work as MySQL DBAs or be involved with MySQL Performance in some way is to ask them what should be tuned in MySQL Server straight after installation, assuming it was installed with default settings. I’m surprised how many people fail to provide any reasonable answer to this […]

Measuring failover time for ScaleArc load balancer

ScaleArc hired Percona to benchmark failover times for the ScaleArc database traffic management software in different scenarios. We tested failover times for various clustered setups, where ScaleArc itself was the load balancer for the cluster. These tests complement other performance tests on the ScaleArc software – sysbench testing for latency and testing for WordPress acceleration. […]