July 31, 2014

Failover with the MySQL Utilities – Part 1: mysqlrpladmin

MySQL Utilities are a set of tools provided by Oracle to perform many kinds of administrative tasks. When GTID-replication is enabled, 2 tools can be used for slave promotion: mysqlrpladmin and mysqlfailover. We will review mysqlrpladmin (version 1.4.3) in this post. Summary mysqlrpladmin can perform manual failover/switchover when GTID-replication is enabled. You need to have […]

Replication in MySQL 5.6: GTIDs benefits and limitations – Part 1

Global Transactions Identifiers are one of the new features regarding replication in MySQL 5.6. They open up a lot of opportunities to make the life of DBAs much easier when having to maintain servers under a specific replication topology. However you should keep in mind some limitations of the current implementation. This post is the […]

Virident vCache vs. FlashCache: Part 1

(This is part one of a two part series) Over the past few weeks I have been looking at a preview release of Virident’s vCache software, which is a kernel module and set of utilities designed to provide functionality similar to that of FlashCache. In particular, Virident engaged Percona to do a usability and feature-set […]

InnoDB Full-text Search in MySQL 5.6 (part 1)

I’ve never been a very big fan of MyISAM; I would argue that in most situations, any possible advantages to using MyISAM are far outweighed by the potential disadvantages and the strengths of InnoDB. However, up until MySQL 5.6, MyISAM was the only storage engine with support for full-text search (FTS). And I’ve encountered many […]

Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo 2013 – News from the Committee – Part 1

I was honored to be asked to be a member of the committee for the “big” MySQL conference: Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo 2013 in Santa Clara, CA.  Personally, I’ve been attending this conference for 6 or 7 years and missing it only when my wife was pregnant with a due date in April […]

MySQL on Amazon RDS part 1: insert performance

Amazon’s Relational Database Service (RDS) is a cloud-hosted MySQL solution. I’ve had some clients hitting performance limitations on standard EC2 servers with EBS volumes (see SSD versus EBS death match), and one of them wanted to evaluate RDS as a replacement. It is built on the same technologies, but the hardware and networking are supposed […]

MySQL Limitations Part 1: Single-Threaded Replication

I recently mentioned a few of the big “non-starter” limitations Postgres has overcome for specific use cases. I decided to write a series of blog posts on MySQL’s unsolved severe limitations. I mean limitations that really hobble it for major, important needs — not in areas where it isn’t used, but in areas where it […]

High availability for MySQL on Amazon EC2 – Part 1 – Intro

Like many, I have been seduced by the power and flexibility of Amazon EC2. Being able to launch new instances at will depending on the load, is almost too good to be true. Amazon has also some drawbacks, availability is not guaranteed and discovery protocols relying on Ethernet broadcast or multicast cannot be used. That […]

MySQL-Memcached or NOSQL Tokyo Tyrant – part 1

All to often people force themselves into using a database like MySQL with no thought into whether if its the best solution to there problem. Why?  Because their other applications use it, so why not the new application?  Over the past couple of months I have been doing a ton of work for clients who […]

InnoDB vs MyISAM vs Falcon benchmarks – part 1

Several days ago MySQL AB made new storage engine Falcon available for wide auditory. We cannot miss this event and executed several benchmarks to see how Falcon performs in comparison to InnoDB and MyISAM. The second goal of benchmark was a popular myth that MyISAM is faster than InnoDB in reads, as InnoDB is transactional, […]