April 16, 2014

InnoDB performance optimization basics (redux)

I recently stumbled upon a post that Peter Zaitsev published back in 2007 titled “Innodb Performance Optimization Basics.” It’s a great post and reading it inspired me to examine what’s changed in the nearly six years that have followed in terms of MySQL, Percona Server – as well as in all of the other now-available […]

Testing Intel, Samsung & SanDisk SATA SSD

While working on the service architecture for one of our projects, I considered several SATA SSD options as the possible main storage for the data. The system will be quite write intensive, so the main interest is the write performance on capacities close to full-size storage. After some research I picked several candidates (I show […]

InnoDB Full-text Search in MySQL 5.6: Part 3, Performance

This is part 3 of a 3 part series covering the new InnoDB full-text search features in MySQL 5.6. To catch up on the previous parts, see part 1 or part 2 Some of you may recall a few months ago that I promised a third part in my InnoDB full-text search (FTS) series, in […]

Testing the Micron P320h

The Micron P320h SSD is an SLC-based PCIe solid-state storage device which claims to provide the highest read throughput of any server-grade SSD, and at Micron’s request, I recently took some time to put the card through its paces, and the numbers are indeed quite impressive. For reference, the benchmarks for this device were performed […]

Memory allocators: MySQL performance improvements in Percona Server 5.5.30-30.2

In addition to the problem with trx_list scan we discussed in Friday’s post, there is another issue in InnoDB transaction processing that notably affects MySQL performance – for every transaction InnoDB creates a read view and allocates memory for this structure from heap. The problem is that the heap for that allocation is destroyed on […]

trx descriptors: MySQL performance improvements in Percona Server 5.5.30-30.2

One major problem in terms of MySQL performance that still stands in the way of InnoDB scalability is the trx_list scan on consistent read view creation. It was originally reported as a part of MySQL bug #49169 and can be described as follows. Whenever a connection wants to create a consistent read, it has to […]

Testing the Virident FlashMAX II

Approximately 11 months ago, Vadim reported some test results from the Virident FlashMax 1400M, an MLC PCIe SSD device. Since that time, Virident has released the FlashMAX II, which promises both increased capacity and increased performance over the previous model. In this post, we present some benchmark results comparing this new model to its predecessor, […]

MySQL performance: Impact of memory allocators (Part 2)

Last time I wrote about memory allocators and how they can affect MySQL performance in general. This time I would like to explore this topic from a bit different angle: What impact does the number of processor cores have on different memory allocators and what difference we will see in MySQL performance in this scenario? […]

Serious build and testing automation

Here at Percona we’ve spent a lot of time improving our development and testing practices. Why? Because constant innovation keeps us ahead and more productive. We want to work smarter, not harder. One of the tools we use is the Jenkins Continuous Integration server. We use Jenkins pretty heavily to help with out development processes […]

Quality Assurance: Percona Server Development Now Monitored by Automated Sysbench Performance Regression Checks!

Continuous integration of new features and bug fixes is great – but what if a small change in seemingly insignificant code causes a major performance regression in overall server performance? We need to ensure this does not happen. That said, performance regressions can be hard to detect. They may hide for some time (or be […]