July 22, 2014

read_buffer_size can break your replication

There are some variables that can affect the replication behavior and sometimes cause some big troubles. In this post I’m going to talk about read_buffer_size and how this variable together with max_allowed_packet can break your replication. The setup is a master-master replication with the following values: max_allowed_packet = 32M read_buffer_size = 100M To break the […]

MySQL: what read_buffer_size value is optimal ?

The more I work with MySQL Performance Optimization and Optimization for other applications the better I understand I have to less believe in common sense or common sense of documentation writers and do more benchmarks and performance research. I just recently wrote about rather surprising results with sort performance and today I’ve discovered even read_buffer_size […]

What exactly is read_rnd_buffer_size

Looking for documentation for read_rnd_buffer_size you would find descriptions such as “The read_rnd_buffer_size is used after a sort, when reading rows in sorted order. If you use many queries with ORDER BY, upping this can improve performance” which is cool but it does not really tell you how exactly read_rnd_buffer_size works as well as which […]

Percona Server: Thread Pool Improvements for Transactional Workloads

In a previous thread pool post, I mentioned that in Percona Server we used an open source implementation of MariaDB’s thread pool, and enhanced/improved it further. Below I would like to describe some of these improvements for transactional workloads. When we were evaluating MariaDB’s thread pool implementation, we observed that it improves scalability for AUTOCOMMIT […]

Percona Server: Improve Scalability with Percona Thread Pool

By default, for every client connection the MySQL server spawns a separate thread which will process all statements for this connection. This is the ‘one-thread-per-connection’ model. It’s simple and efficient until some number of connections N is reached. After this point performance of the MySQL server will degrade, mostly due to various contentions caused by […]

LVM read performance during snapshots

For the same customer I am exploring ZFS for backups, the twin server is using regular LVM and XFS. On this twin, I have setup mylvmbackup for a more conservative backup approach. I quickly found some odd behaviors, the backup was taking much longer than what I was expecting. It is not the first time […]

Is your MySQL buffer pool warm? Make it sweat!

Today’s blog post diving into the waters of the MySQL buffer pool is a cross-post from Groupon’s engineering blog, and is Part 1 of 2. Thank you to Kyle Oppenheim at Groupon for contributing to this project and post. We’ll be posting Part 2 on Thursday. I’ll be at the Percona Live MySQL Conference and […]

btrfs – probably not ready yet

Every time I have a conversation on SSD, someone mentions btrfs filesystem. And usually it is colored as a solution that will solve all our problems, improve overall performance and SSD in particular, and it is a saviour. Of course it caught my curiosity and I decided to perform a benchmark similar to what I […]

Multi Range Read (MRR) in MySQL 5.6 and MariaDB 5.5

This is the second blog post in the series of blog posts leading up to the talk comparing the optimizer enhancements in MySQL 5.6 and MariaDB 5.5. This blog post is aimed at the optimizer enhancement Multi Range Read (MRR). Its available in both MySQL 5.6 and MariaDB 5.5 Now let’s take a look at […]

What’s a good buffer pool read/write ratio?

At Percona Live last week, someone showed me a graph from their Cacti monitoring system, using the templates that I wrote. It was the buffer pool pages read, written, and created. He asked me if the graph was okay. Shouldn’t there be a lot more pages read than written, he asked? It’s a great question. […]