April 21, 2014

InnoDB thread concurrency

InnoDB has a mechanism to regulate count of threads working inside InnoDB. innodb_thread_concurrency is variable which set this count, and there are two friendly variables innodb_thread_sleep_delay and innodb_concurrency_tickets. I’ll try to explain how it works. MySQL has pluginable architecture which divides work between mysql common code (parser, optimizer) and storage engine. From storage engine’s point […]

Heartbleed: Separating FAQ From FUD

If you’ve been following this blog (my colleague, David Busby, posted about it yesterday) or any tech news outlet in the past few days, you’ve probably seen some mention of the “Heartbleed” vulnerability in certain versions of the OpenSSL library. So what is ‘Heartbleed’, really? In short, Heartbleed is an information-leak issue. An attacker can […]

How to add an existing Percona XtraDB Cluster to Percona ClusterControl

In my last blog post I explained how to use Percona ClusterControl to create a new Percona XtraDB Cluster from scratch. That’s a good option when you want to create a testing environment in just some mouse clicks. In this case I’m going to show you how to add your existing cluster to Percona ClusterControl […]

ScaleArc: Benchmarking with sysbench

ScaleArc recently hired Percona to perform various tests on its database traffic management product. This post is the outcome of the benchmarks carried out by Uday Sawant (ScaleArc) and myself. You can also download the report directly as a PDF here. The goal of these benchmarks is to identify the potential overhead of the ScaleArc […]

Creating GEO-enabled applications with MySQL 5.6

In my previous post I’ve showed some new MySQL 5.6 features which can be very helpful when creating geo-enabled applications. In this post I will show how we can obtain open-source GIS data, convert it to MySQL and use it in our GEO-enabled applications. I will also present at the upcoming Percona Live conference on this […]

Tools and tips for analysis of MySQL’s Slow Query Log

MySQL has a nice feature, slow query log, which allows you to log all queries that exceed a predefined about of time to execute. Peter Zaitsev first wrote about this back in 2006 – there have been a few other posts here on the MySQL Performance Blog since then (check this and this, too) but […]

Q&A: Common (but deadly) MySQL Development Mistakes

On Wednesday I gave a presentation on “How to Avoid Common (but Deadly) MySQL Development Mistakes” for Percona MySQL Webinars. If you missed it, you can still register to view the recording and my slides. Thanks to everyone who attended, and especially to folks who asked the great questions. I answered as many as we had time […]

Many-table joins in MySQL 5.6

I recently worked on an uncommon slow query: less than 100 rows were read and returned, the whole dataset was fitting in memory but the query took several seconds to run. Long story short: the query was a join involving 21 tables, running on MySQL 5.1. But by default MySQL 5.1 is not good at […]

How rows_sent can be more than rows_examined?

When looking at queries that are candidates for optimization I often recommend that people look at rows_sent and rows_examined values as available in the slow query log (as well as some other places). If rows_examined is by far larger than rows_sent, say 100 larger, then the query is a great candidate for optimization. Optimization could […]

How to monitor ALTER TABLE progress in MySQL

While working on a recent support issue as a Percona Support Engineer,  I got one question from a customer asking how to monitor ALTER TABLE progress. Actually, for MySQL 5.5 and prior versions, it’s quite difficult to ALTER the table in a running production environment especially for large tables (with millions records). Because it will rebuild and lock the table […]