April 18, 2014

read_buffer_size can break your replication

There are some variables that can affect the replication behavior and sometimes cause some big troubles. In this post I’m going to talk about read_buffer_size and how this variable together with max_allowed_packet can break your replication. The setup is a master-master replication with the following values: max_allowed_packet = 32M read_buffer_size = 100M To break the […]

STOP: DELETE IGNORE on Tables with Foreign Keys Can Break Replication

DELETE IGNORE suppresses errors and downgrades them as warnings, if you are not aware how IGNORE behaves on tables with FOREIGN KEYs, you could be in for a surprise. Let’s take a table with data as example, column c1 on table t2 references column c1 on table t1 – both columns have identical set of rows for […]

Percona XtraDB Cluster Feature 2: Multi-Master replication

This is about the second great feature – Multi-Master replication, what you get with Percona XtraDB Cluster. It is recommended you get familiar with general architecture of the cluster, described on the previous post. By Multi-Master I mean the ability to write to any node in your cluster and do not worry that eventually you […]

How Does Semisynchronous MySQL Replication Work?

With the recent release of Percona XtraDB Cluster, I am increasingly being asked about MySQL’s semi-synchronous replication. I find that there are often a number of misconceptions about how semi-synchronous replication really works. I think it is very important to understand what guarantees you actually get with semi-synchronous replication, and what you don’t get. The […]

Actively monitoring replication connectivity with MySQL’s heartbeat

Until MySQL 5.5 the only variable used to identify a network connectivity problem between Master and Slave was slave-net-timeout. This variable specifies the number of seconds to wait for more Binary Logs events from the master before abort the connection and establish it again. With a default value of 3600 this has been a historically […]

Statement based replication with Stored Functions, Triggers and Events

Statement based replication writes the queries that modify data in the Binary Log to replicate them on the slave or to use it as a PITR recovery. Here we will see what is the behavior of the MySQL when it needs to log “not usual” queries like Events, Functions, Stored Procedures, Local Variables, etc. We’ll […]

MySQL Limitations Part 1: Single-Threaded Replication

I recently mentioned a few of the big “non-starter” limitations Postgres has overcome for specific use cases. I decided to write a series of blog posts on MySQL’s unsolved severe limitations. I mean limitations that really hobble it for major, important needs — not in areas where it isn’t used, but in areas where it […]

Replication of MEMORY (HEAP) Tables

Some Applications need to store some transient data which is frequently regenerated and MEMORY table look like a very good match for this sort of tasks. Unfortunately this will bite when you will be looking to add Replication to your environment as MEMORY tables do not play well with replication.

Debugging problems with row based replication

MySQL 5.1 introduces row based binary logging. In fact, the default binary logging format in GA versions of MySQL 5.1 is ‘MIXED’ STATEMENT*;   The binlog_format  variable can still be changed per sessions which means it is possible that some of your binary log entries will be written in a row-based fashion instead of the […]

Making replication a bit more reliable

Running MySQL slave is quite common and regular task which we do every day, taking backups from slave is often recommended solution. However the current state of MySQL replication makes restoring slave a bit tricky (if possible at all). The main problem is that InnoDB transaction state and replication state are not synchronized. If we […]