July 28, 2014

How to identify and cure MySQL replication slave lag

Here on the Percona MySQL Support team, we often see issues where a customer is complaining about replication delays – and many times the problem ends up being tied to MySQL replication slave lag. This of course is nothing new for MySQL users and we’ve had a few posts here on the MySQL Performance Blog […]

Introducing backup locks in Percona Server

TL;DR version: The backup locks feature introduced in Percona Server 5.6.16-64.0 is a lightweight alternative to FLUSH TABLES WITH READ LOCK and can be used to take both physical and logical backups with less downtime on busy servers. To employ the feature with mysqldump, use mysqldump –lock-for-backup –single-transaction. The next release of Percona XtraBackup will […]

InnoDB file formats: Here is one pitfall to avoid

UPDATED: explaining the role of innodb_strict_mode and correcting introduction of innodb_file_format Compressed tables is an example of an InnoDB feature that became available with the Barracuda file format, introduced in the InnoDB plugin. They can bring significant gains in raw performance and scalability: given the data is stored in a compressed format the amount of […]

read_buffer_size can break your replication

There are some variables that can affect the replication behavior and sometimes cause some big troubles. In this post I’m going to talk about read_buffer_size and how this variable together with max_allowed_packet can break your replication. The setup is a master-master replication with the following values: max_allowed_packet = 32M read_buffer_size = 100M To break the […]

How to convert MySQL’s SHOW PROFILES into a real profile

SHOW PROFILES shows how much time MySQL spends in various phases of query execution, but it isn’t a full-featured profile. By that, I mean that it doesn’t show similar phases aggregated together, doesn’t sort them by worst-first, and doesn’t show the relative amount of time consumed. I’ll profile the “nicer_but_slower_film_list” included with the Sakila sample […]

MySQL Limitations Part 1: Single-Threaded Replication

I recently mentioned a few of the big “non-starter” limitations Postgres has overcome for specific use cases. I decided to write a series of blog posts on MySQL’s unsolved severe limitations. I mean limitations that really hobble it for major, important needs — not in areas where it isn’t used, but in areas where it […]

Estimating Replication Capacity

It is easy for MySQL replication to become bottleneck when Master server is not seriously loaded and the more cores and hard drives the get the larger the difference becomes, as long as replication remains single thread process. At the same time it is a lot easier to optimize your system when your replication runs […]

Why audit logging with triggers in MySQL is bad for replication

Recently I was tasked with investigating slippage between master and slave in a standard replication setup. The client was using Maatkit’s mk-table-checksum to check his slave data was indeed a fair copy of that of the master.

How to load large files safely into InnoDB with LOAD DATA INFILE

Recently I had a customer ask me about loading two huge files into InnoDB with LOAD DATA INFILE. The goal was to load this data on many servers without putting it into the binary log. While this is generally a fast way to load data (especially if you disable unique key checks and foreign key […]

MySQL Replication vs DRBD Battles

Well these days we see a lot of post for and against (more, more) using of MySQL and DRBD as a high availability practice. I personally think DRBD has its place but there are far more cases when other techniques would work much better for variety of reasons. First let me start with Florian’s comments […]