July 29, 2014

MySQL 5.5-m2 scalability

Oracle recently announcent MySQL-5.5.2-m2 milestone, and I have a predition that MySQL-5.5 will be announced as GA on MySQL UC 2010 in April. So let’s make quick on scalability characteristics we should expect from new release. I made sysbench oltp benchmarks on 10 mln rows (worth 2.5GB of data), on our Dell R900 system ( […]

Scaling to 256-way the Sun way

As you may have recently seen there are some articles about scaling MySQL one 256-way system. I though wow did they really make it work, considering how many bottlenecks remain in MySQL. What article really tells us ?

MySQL Performance on Memory Appliance

Recently I have had a chance to check out MySQL Performance on “Memory Appliance” by Violin Memory which can be used as extremely high speed storage system. I helped Violin Memory to optimize MySQL for customer workload and Violin memory and also had a chance to do some benchmarks on my own. 2*Quad Core Xeon […]

ScaleArc: Benchmarking with sysbench

ScaleArc recently hired Percona to perform various tests on its database traffic management product. This post is the outcome of the benchmarks carried out by Uday Sawant (ScaleArc) and myself. You can also download the report directly as a PDF here. The goal of these benchmarks is to identify the potential overhead of the ScaleArc […]

Intel Nehalem vs AMD Opteron shootout in sysbench workload

Having two big boxes in our lab, one based Intel Nehalem (Cisco UCS C250) and second on AMD Opteron (Dell PowerEdge R815), I decided to run some simple sysbench benchmark to compare how both CPUs perform and what kind of scalability we can expect.

Shard-Query adds parallelism to queries

Preamble: On performance, workload and scalability: MySQL has always been focused on OLTP workloads. In fact, both Percona Server and MySQL 5.5.7rc have numerous performance improvements which benefit workloads that have high concurrency. Typical OLTP workloads feature numerous clients (perhaps hundreds or thousands) each reading and writing small chunks of data. The recent improvements to […]

Why you don’t want to shard.

Note: This blog post is part 1 of 4 on building our training workshop.

The Percona training workshop will not cover sharding. If you follow our blog, you’ll notice we don’t talk much about the subject; in some cases it makes sense, but in many we’ve seen that it causes architectures to be prematurely complicated.

So let me state it: You don’t want to shard.

Optimize everything else first, and then if performance still isn’t good enough, it’s time to take a very bitter medicine. The reason you need to shard basically comes down to one of these two reasons

Another ingenious piece of Sun Marketing

So a while ago I wrote about fun post about MySQL Scalability to 256 way…. Besides discussion on the thread itself I had a lot of private comments in my mail from Sun/MySQL employees which tended to agree with me on this being the a large stretch.