July 28, 2014

Another reason why SQL_SLAVE_SKIP_COUNTER is bad in MySQL

It is everywhere in the world of MySQL that if your replication is broken because an event caused a duplicate key or a row was not found and it cannot be updated or deleted, then you can use ‘ STOP SLAVE; SET GLOBAL SQL_SLAVE_SKIP_COUNTER=1; START SLAVE; ‘ and be done with it. In some cases this is fine and you can repair the […]

What kind of queries are bad for MySQL?

In writing a recommendation for our Web development team on how to use MySQL, I came up with the following list, which I want to share: What kind of queries are bad for MySQL? Any query is bad. Send a query only if you must. (Hint: use caching like memcache or redis) Queries that examine […]

Memory allocators: MySQL performance improvements in Percona Server 5.5.30-30.2

In addition to the problem with trx_list scan we discussed in Friday’s post, there is another issue in InnoDB transaction processing that notably affects MySQL performance – for every transaction InnoDB creates a read view and allocates memory for this structure from heap. The problem is that the heap for that allocation is destroyed on […]

How is join_buffer_size allocated?

When examining MySQL configuration, we quite often want to know how various buffer sizes are used. This matters because some buffers (sort_buffer_size for example) are allocated to their full size immediately as soon as they are needed, but others are effectively a “max size” and the corresponding buffers are allocated only as big as needed […]

Faster MySQL failover with SELECT mirroring

One of my favorite MySQL configurations for high availability is master-master replication, which is just like normal master-slave replication except that you can fail over in both directions. Aside from MySQL Cluster, which is more special-purpose, this is probably the best general-purpose way to get fast failover and a bunch of other benefits (non-blocking ALTER […]

Why audit logging with triggers in MySQL is bad for replication

Recently I was tasked with investigating slippage between master and slave in a standard replication setup. The client was using Maatkit’s mk-table-checksum to check his slave data was indeed a fair copy of that of the master.

UNION vs UNION ALL Performance

When I was comparing performance of UNION vs MySQL 5.0 index merge algorithm Sinisa pointed out I should be using UNION ALL instead of simple UNION in my benchmarks, and he was right. Numbers would be different but it should not change general point of having optimization of moving LIMIT inside of union clause being […]

Redundant index is not always bad

About year ago Peter wrote about redundant indexes and mentioned sometimes it is good to leave two indexes, even one is first part of another. I’m speaking about BTREE indexes, for example, KEY (A), and KEY (A,B). From SQL point of view KEY(A) is not needed, as for queries like WHERE A=5 the index (A,B) […]

INSERT INTO … SELECT Performance with Innodb tables.

Everyone using Innodb tables probably got use to the fact Innodb tables perform non locking reads, meaning unless you use some modifiers such as LOCK IN SHARE MODE or FOR UPDATE, SELECT statements will not lock any rows while running. This is generally correct, however there a notable exception – INSERT INTO table1 SELECT * […]

Sysbench Benchmarking of Tesora’s Database Virtualization Engine

Tesora, previously called Parelastic, asked Percona to do a sysbench benchmark evaluation of its Database Virtualization Engine on specific architectures on Amazon EC2. The focus of Tesora is to provide a scalable Database As A Service platform for OpenStack. The Database Virtualization Engine (DVE) plays a part in this as it aims at allowing databases […]