July 23, 2014

Parallel Query for MySQL with Shard-Query

While Shard-Query can work over multiple nodes, this blog post focuses on using Shard-Query with a single node.  Shard-Query can add parallelism to queries which use partitioned tables.  Very large tables can often be partitioned fairly easily. Shard-Query can leverage partitioning to add paralellism, because each partition can be queried independently. Because MySQL 5.6 supports the […]

Q&A: Common (but deadly) MySQL Development Mistakes

On Wednesday I gave a presentation on “How to Avoid Common (but Deadly) MySQL Development Mistakes” for Percona MySQL Webinars. If you missed it, you can still register to view the recording and my slides. Thanks to everyone who attended, and especially to folks who asked the great questions. I answered as many as we had time […]

How to monitor ALTER TABLE progress in MySQL

While working on a recent support issue as a Percona Support Engineer,  I got one question from a customer asking how to monitor ALTER TABLE progress. Actually, for MySQL 5.5 and prior versions, it’s quite difficult to ALTER the table in a running production environment especially for large tables (with millions records). Because it will rebuild and lock the table […]

Multiple column index vs multiple indexes with MySQL 5.6

A question often comes when talking about indexing: should we use multiple column indexes or multiple indexes on single columns? Peter Zaitsev wrote about it back in 2008 and the conclusion then was that a multiple column index is most often the best solution. But with all the recent optimizer improvements, is there anything different with […]

MySQL 5.6 vs MySQL 5.5 and the Star Schema Benchmark

So far most of the benchmarks posted about MySQL 5.6 use the sysbench OLTP workload.  I wanted to test a set of queries which, unlike sysbench, utilize joins.  I also wanted an easily reproducible set of data which is more rich than the simple sysbench table.  The Star Schema Benchmark (SSB) seems ideal for this. […]

Wow. My 6 year old MySQL Bug is finally fixed in MySQL 5.6

I got the message in the morning today about the bug being fixed in MySQL 5.6.6…. which I reported in Early 2006 (while still being with MySQL) and running MySQL 4.1 I honestly thought this issue was fixed long ago as it was indeed pretty annoying. I must say I’m very impressed with Oracle team […]

Join Optimizations in MySQL 5.6 and MariaDB 5.5

This is the third blog post in the series of blog posts leading up to the talk comparing the optimizer enhancements in MySQL 5.6 and MariaDB 5.5. This blog post is targeted at the join related optimizations introduced in the optimizer. These optimizations are available in both MySQL 5.6 and MariaDB 5.5, and MariaDB 5.5 […]

MySQL caching methods and tips

“The least expensive query is the query you never run.” Data access is expensive for your application. It often requires CPU, network and disk access, all of which can take a lot of time. Using less computing resources, particularly in the cloud, results in decreased overall operational costs, so caches provide real value by avoiding […]

How much memory can MySQL use in the worst case?

I vaguely recall a couple of blog posts recently asking something like “what’s the formula to compute mysqld’s worst-case maximum memory usage?” Various formulas are in wide use, but none of them is fully correct. Here’s why: you can’t write an equation for it.

Multi-Column IN clause – Unexpected MySQL Issue

We have an application which stores massive amount of urls. To save on indexes instead of using URL we index CRC32 of the URL which allows to find matching urls quickly. There is a bit of chance there would be some false positives but these are filtered out after reading the data so it works […]