April 18, 2014

Creating GEO-enabled applications with MySQL 5.6

In my previous post I’ve showed some new MySQL 5.6 features which can be very helpful when creating geo-enabled applications. In this post I will show how we can obtain open-source GIS data, convert it to MySQL and use it in our GEO-enabled applications. I will also present at the upcoming Percona Live conference on this […]

How to monitor ALTER TABLE progress in MySQL

While working on a recent support issue as a Percona Support Engineer,  I got one question from a customer asking how to monitor ALTER TABLE progress. Actually, for MySQL 5.5 and prior versions, it’s quite difficult to ALTER the table in a running production environment especially for large tables (with millions records). Because it will rebuild and lock the table […]

[ERROR] mysqld: Sort aborted: Server shutdown in progress

Recently, one of our support customers faced this: “[ERROR] mysqld: Sort aborted: Server shutdown in progress.” At first it would appear this occurred because of a mysql restart (i.e. the MySQL server restarted and the query got killed during the stopping of mysql). However, while debugging this problem I found no evidence of a MySQL […]

Useful MySQL 5.6 features you get for free in PXC 5.6

I get a lot of questions about Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.6 (PXC 5.6), specifically about whether such and such MySQL 5.6 Community Edition feature is in PXC 5.6.  The short answer is: yes, all features in community MySQL 5.6 are in Percona Server 5.6 and, in turn, are in PXC 5.6.  Whether or not the new […]

Using the new spatial functions in MySQL 5.6 for geo-enabled applications

Geo-enabled (or location enabled) applications are very common nowadays and many of them use MySQL. The common tasks for such applications are: Find all points of interests (i.e. coffee shops) around (i.e. a 10 mile radius) the given location (latitude and longitude). For example we want to show this to a user of the mobile […]

MySQL 5.6 security vs ease of use

MySQL 5.6 surely changes the game when it comes to security vs ease of use. Before MySQL 5.6 we would get default MySQL installation being pretty insecure – the user “root” will be created with no password as well as anonymous user with limited access from local host (though still enough to cause DOS attack […]

Another reason why SQL_SLAVE_SKIP_COUNTER is bad in MySQL

It is everywhere in the world of MySQL that if your replication is broken because an event caused a duplicate key or a row was not found and it cannot be updated or deleted, then you can use ‘ STOP SLAVE; SET GLOBAL SQL_SLAVE_SKIP_COUNTER=1; START SLAVE; ’ and be done with it. In some cases this is fine and you can repair the […]

Schema changes – what’s new in MySQL 5.6?

Among many of the improvements you can enjoy in MySQL 5.6, there is one that addresses a huge operational problem that most DBAs and System Administrators encounter in their life: schema changes. While it is usually not a problem for small tables or those in early stages of product life cycle, schema changes become a […]

The small improvements of MySQL 5.6: Duplicate Index Detection

Here at the MySQL Performance Blog, we’ve been discussing the several new features that MySQL 5.6 brought: GTID-based replication, InnoDB Fulltext, Memcached integration, a more complete performance schema, online DDL and several other InnoDB and query optimizer improvements. However, I plan to focus on a series of posts on the small but handy improvements – […]

Disconnecting a replication slave is easier with MySQL 5.5+ (RESET SLAVE vs. RESET SLAVE ALL)

It’s not uncommon to promote a server from slave to master. One of the key things to protect your data integrity is to make sure that the promoted slave is permanently disconnected from its old master. If not, it may get writes from the old master, which can cause all kinds of data corruption. MySQL […]