August 1, 2014

Quality Assurance: Percona Server Development Now Monitored by Automated Sysbench Performance Regression Checks!

Continuous integration of new features and bug fixes is great – but what if a small change in seemingly insignificant code causes a major performance regression in overall server performance? We need to ensure this does not happen. That said, performance regressions can be hard to detect. They may hide for some time (or be […]

Sysbench evaluation of iSCSI performance

Partha Dutta posted pretty interesting post about iSCSI vs SCSI performance using SysBench. This is nice to finally see some iSCSI benchmarks done with MySQL – something we were planning to do for a while but never ended up doing, mainly due to lack of hardware available for tests. It is also good to see […]

Sysbench Benchmarking of Tesora’s Database Virtualization Engine

Tesora, previously called Parelastic, asked Percona to do a sysbench benchmark evaluation of its Database Virtualization Engine on specific architectures on Amazon EC2. The focus of Tesora is to provide a scalable Database As A Service platform for OpenStack. The Database Virtualization Engine (DVE) plays a part in this as it aims at allowing databases […]

Semi-Sync replication performance in MySQL 5.7.4 DMR

I was interested to hear about semi-sync replication improvements in MySQL’s 5.7.4 DMR release and decided to check it out.  I previously blogged about poor semi-sync performance and was pretty disappointed from semi-sync’s performance across WAN distances back then, particularly with many client threads. The Test The basic environment of these tests was: AWS EC2 […]

ScaleArc: Benchmarking with sysbench

ScaleArc recently hired Percona to perform various tests on its database traffic management product. This post is the outcome of the benchmarks carried out by Uday Sawant (ScaleArc) and myself. You can also download the report directly as a PDF here. The goal of these benchmarks is to identify the potential overhead of the ScaleArc […]

PERFORMANCE_SCHEMA vs Slow Query Log

A couple of weeks ago, shortly after Vadim wrote about Percona Cloud Tools and using Slow Query Log to capture the data, Mark Leith asked why don’t we just use Performance Schema instead? This is an interesting question and I think it deserves its own blog post to talk about. First, I would say main […]

SSL Performance Overhead in MySQL

NOTE: This is part 1 of what will be a two-part series on the performance implications of using in-flight data encryption. Some of you may recall my security webinar from back in mid-August; one of the follow-up questions that I was asked was about the performance impact of enabling SSL connections. My answer was 25%, […]

Memory allocators: MySQL performance improvements in Percona Server 5.5.30-30.2

In addition to the problem with trx_list scan we discussed in Friday’s post, there is another issue in InnoDB transaction processing that notably affects MySQL performance – for every transaction InnoDB creates a read view and allocates memory for this structure from heap. The problem is that the heap for that allocation is destroyed on […]

trx descriptors: MySQL performance improvements in Percona Server 5.5.30-30.2

One major problem in terms of MySQL performance that still stands in the way of InnoDB scalability is the trx_list scan on consistent read view creation. It was originally reported as a part of MySQL bug #49169 and can be described as follows. Whenever a connection wants to create a consistent read, it has to […]

Why MySQL Performance at Low Concurrency is Important

A few weeks ago I wrote about “MySQL Performance at High Concurrency” and why it is important, which was followed up by Vadim’s post on ThreadPool in Percona Server providing some great illustration on the topic. This time I want to target an opposite question: why MySQL performance at low concurrency is important for you. […]