April 24, 2014

MySQL File System Fragmentation Benchmarks

Few days ago I wrote about testing writing to many files and seeing how this affects sequential read performance. I was very interested to see how it shows itself with real tables so I’ve got the script and ran tests for MyISAM and Innodb tables on ext3 filesystem. Here is what I found:

A closer look at Percona Server 5.6

Yesterday we announced the GA release of Percona Server 5.6, the latest release of our enhanced, drop-in replacement for MySQL. Percona Server 5.6 is the best free MySQL alternative for demanding applications. Our third major release, Percona Server 5.6 offers all the improvements found in MySQL 5.6 Community Edition plus scalability, availability, backup, and security […]

Percona Server 5.5.30-30.2 rerelease fixes non-restart issue

In our last 5.5 series release of Percona Server, we included a regression in the RPM packaging that prevented the server from restarting following an upgrade — instead, the server would remain stopped after the upgrade was completed regardless of its state before updating. This caused some problems for some users, especially if automatic upgrading was configured […]

Understanding Multi-node writing conflict metrics in Percona XtraDB Cluster and Galera

I have addressed previously how multi-node writing causes unexpected deadlocks in PXC, at least, it is unexpected unless you know how Galera replication works.  This is a complicated topic and I personally feel like I’m only just starting to wrap my head around it. The magic of Galera replication The short of it is that Galera […]

Tokyo Tyrant -The Extras Part III : Write Bottleneck

This is part 3 of my Tyrant extra’s, part 1 focused on durability, part 2 focused on the perceived performance wall. #3.  Tokyo Cabinet Can have only a single writer thread, bottlenecking performance When writing an application using Tokyo Cabinet only one connection can be opened as a “writer”  while the rest are readers.  Tyrant […]

XtraDB: The Top 10 enhancements

Note: This post is part 2 of 4 on building our training workshop. Last week I talked about why you don’t want to shard. This week I’m following up with the top 10 enhancements that XtraDB has over the built-in InnoDB included in MySQL 5.0 and 5.1.  Building this list was not really a scientific […]

Limiting InnoDB Data Dictionary

One of InnoDB’s features is that memory allocated for internal tables definitions is not limited and may grow indefinitely. You may not notice it if you have an usual application with say 100-1000 tables. But for hosting providers and for user oriented applications ( each user has dedicated database / table) it is disaster. For […]

Living with backups

Everyone does backups. Usually it’s some nightly batch job that just dumps all MySQL tables into a text file or ordinarily copies the binary files from the data directory to a safe location. Obviously both ways involve much more complex operations than it would seem by my last sentence, but it is not important right […]

What is the longest part of Innodb Recovery Process ?

In MySQL 4.1 and above the longest part of recovery after crash for Innodb tables could be UNDO stage – it was happening in foreground and was basically unbound – if you have large enough transaction which needed to be undone this could take long hours. REDO stage on other hand always could be regulated […]

Heikki Tuuri answers to Innodb questions, Part II

I now got answers to the second portions of the questions you asked Heikki. If you have not seen the first part it can be found here. Same as during last time I will provide my comments for some of the answers under PZ and will use HT for original Heikkis answer. Q26: You also […]