July 29, 2014

Differences between READ-COMMITTED and REPEATABLE-READ transaction isolation levels

As an instructor with Percona I’m sometimes asked about the differences between the READ COMMITTED and REPEATABLE READ transaction isolation levels.  There are a few differences between READ-COMMITTED and REPEATABLE-READ, and they are all related to locking.

Percona Server: Thread Pool Improvements for Transactional Workloads

In a previous thread pool post, I mentioned that in Percona Server we used an open source implementation of MariaDB’s thread pool, and enhanced/improved it further. Below I would like to describe some of these improvements for transactional workloads. When we were evaluating MariaDB’s thread pool implementation, we observed that it improves scalability for AUTOCOMMIT […]

Flexviews is a working scalable database transactional memory example

http://Flexvie.ws fully implements a method for creating materialized views for MySQL data sets. The tool is for MySQL, but the methods are database agnostic. A materialized view is an analogue of software transactional memory. You can think of this as database transactional memory, or as database state distributed over time, but in an easy way […]

Innodb undo segment size and transaction isolation

You might know if you have long running transactions you’re risking having a lot of “garbage” accumulated in undo segment size which can cause performance degradation as well as increased disk space usage. Long transactions can also be bad for other reasons such as taking row level locks which will prevent other transactions for execution, […]

Failover with the MySQL Utilities – Part 1: mysqlrpladmin

MySQL Utilities are a set of tools provided by Oracle to perform many kinds of administrative tasks. When GTID-replication is enabled, 2 tools can be used for slave promotion: mysqlrpladmin and mysqlfailover. We will review mysqlrpladmin (version 1.4.3) in this post. Summary mysqlrpladmin can perform manual failover/switchover when GTID-replication is enabled. You need to have […]

Percona Server with TokuDB (beta): Installation, configuration

My previous post was an introduction to the TokuDB storage engine and aimed at explaining the basics of its design and how it differentiates from InnoDB/XtraDB. This post is all about motivating you to give it a try and have a look for yourself. Percona Server is not officially supporting TokuDB as of today, though the […]

Why %util number from iostat is meaningless for MySQL capacity planning

Earlier this month I wrote about vmstat iowait cpu numbers and some of the comments I got were advertising the use of util% as reported by the iostat tool instead. I find this number even more useless for MySQL performance tuning and capacity planning. Now let me start by saying this is a really tricky and deceptive number. Many […]

Getting to know TokuDB for MySQL

During last April’s Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo, TokuDB celebrated it’s first full-year as an open source storage engine. I still remember reading the official announcement and the expectations it created one year ago. The premises were very interesting as it had the potential of helping MySQL manage “big data” in a way InnoDB just […]

How to improve InnoDB performance by 55% for write-bound loads

During April’s Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo 2014, I attended a talk on MySQL 5.7 performance an scalability given by Dimitri Kravtchuk, the Oracle MySQL benchmark specialist. He mentioned at some point that the InnoDB double write buffer was a real performance killer. For the ones that don’t know what the innodb double write […]

Row-based replication, MySQL 5.6 upgrades and temporal data types

Whither your rollback plan? MySQL 5.6 upgrades are in full swing these days and knowing how to safely upgrade from MySQL 5.5 to 5.6 is important. When upgrading a replication environment, it’s important that you can build a migration plan that safely allows for your upgrade with minimal risk — rollback is often a very […]