July 29, 2014

Percona Server: Thread Pool Improvements for Transactional Workloads

In a previous thread pool post, I mentioned that in Percona Server we used an open source implementation of MariaDB’s thread pool, and enhanced/improved it further. Below I would like to describe some of these improvements for transactional workloads. When we were evaluating MariaDB’s thread pool implementation, we observed that it improves scalability for AUTOCOMMIT […]

Percona Server: Improve Scalability with Percona Thread Pool

By default, for every client connection the MySQL server spawns a separate thread which will process all statements for this connection. This is the ‘one-thread-per-connection’ model. It’s simple and efficient until some number of connections N is reached. After this point performance of the MySQL server will degrade, mostly due to various contentions caused by […]

InnoDB performance optimization basics (redux)

I recently stumbled upon a post that Peter Zaitsev published back in 2007 titled “Innodb Performance Optimization Basics.” It’s a great post and reading it inspired me to examine what’s changed in the nearly six years that have followed in terms of MySQL, Percona Server – as well as in all of the other now-available […]

Percona Server 5.5.30-30.2 rerelease fixes non-restart issue

In our last 5.5 series release of Percona Server, we included a regression in the RPM packaging that prevented the server from restarting following an upgrade — instead, the server would remain stopped after the upgrade was completed regardless of its state before updating. This caused some problems for some users, especially if automatic upgrading was configured […]

Edge-case behavior of INSERT…ODKU

A few weeks back, I was working on a customer issue wherein they were observing database performance that dropped through the floor (to the point of an outage) roughly every 4 weeks or so. Nothing special about the environment, the hardware, or the queries; really, the majority of the database was a single table with […]

Why delayed flushing can result in less work

I can think of at least two major reasons why systems delay flushing changes to durable storage: 1. So they can do the work when it’s more convenient. 2. So they can do less work in total. Let’s look at how the second property can be true.

Tuning for heavy writing workloads

For the my previous post, there was comment to suggest to test db_STRESS benchmark on XtraDB by Dimitri. And I tested and tuned for the benchmark. I will show you the tunings. It should be also tuning procedure for general heavy writing workloads. At first, <tuning peak performance>. The next, <tuning purge operation> to stabilize […]

SystemTap – DTrace for Linux ?

Since DTrace was released for Solaris I am missing it on Linux systems… It can’t be included in Linux by the same reason why ZFS can’t be – it’s licensing issue. Both ZFS and DTrace are under CDDL, which is incompatible with GPL. So you can see DTrace and ZFS on Solaris, FreeBSD, MacOS, but […]

Using Multiple Key Caches for MyISAM Scalability

I have written before – MyISAM Does Not Scale, or it does quite well – two main things stopping you is table locks and global mutex on the KeyCache. Table Locks are not the issue for Read Only workload and write intensive workloads can be dealt with by using with many tables but Key Cache […]

Drilling down to the source of the problem

I had an interesting tuning case few days ago. The system serving high traffic using Innodb tables would be stalling every so often causing even very simple queries both reads and writes taking long time to complete, with progress almost paused (dropping from thousands to tens of queries per second). On the surface the problem […]