April 24, 2014

How to monitor ALTER TABLE progress in MySQL

While working on a recent support issue as a Percona Support Engineer,  I got one question from a customer asking how to monitor ALTER TABLE progress. Actually, for MySQL 5.5 and prior versions, it’s quite difficult to ALTER the table in a running production environment especially for large tables (with millions records). Because it will rebuild and lock the table […]

Calvin Sun on MySQL at Twitter, Percona Live 2014 and Facebook

Twitter’s Calvin Sun (@Calvinsun2012) is looking forward to the fast-approaching Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo this April 1-4 in Santa Clara, Calif. He’ll be speaking, yes, but he’s also looking forward to learning from his peers – particularly those at Facebook. Both companies, he explained, are in the rather unique positions of unprecedented rapid […]

Investigating MySQL Replication Latency in Percona XtraDB Cluster

I was curious to check how Percona XtraDB Cluster behaves when it comes to MySQL replication latency — or better yet, call it data propagation latency. It was interesting to see whenever I can get stale data reads from other cluster nodes after write performed to some specific node. To test it I wrote quite a […]

Recovering from a bad UPDATE statement

Did you just run an UPDATE against your 10 million row users table without a WHERE clause?  Did you know that in MySQL 5.5 that sometimes you can recover from a bad UPDATE statement?  This is possible if you are running in binlog_format=ROW ! Imagine this scenario:

We run an accidental UPDATE statement that […]

Should we give a MySQL Query Cache a second chance ?

Over last few years I’ve been suggesting more people to disable Query Cache than to enable it. It can cause contention problems as well as stalls and due to coarse invalidation is not as efficient as it could be. These are however mostly due to neglect Query Cache received over almost 10 years, with very […]

MySQL caching methods and tips

“The least expensive query is the query you never run.” Data access is expensive for your application. It often requires CPU, network and disk access, all of which can take a lot of time. Using less computing resources, particularly in the cloud, results in decreased overall operational costs, so caches provide real value by avoiding […]

MySQL on Amazon RDS part 1: insert performance

Amazon’s Relational Database Service (RDS) is a cloud-hosted MySQL solution. I’ve had some clients hitting performance limitations on standard EC2 servers with EBS volumes (see SSD versus EBS death match), and one of them wanted to evaluate RDS as a replacement. It is built on the same technologies, but the hardware and networking are supposed […]

MySQL-Memcached or NOSQL Tokyo Tyrant – part 1

All to often people force themselves into using a database like MySQL with no thought into whether if its the best solution to there problem. Why?  Because their other applications use it, so why not the new application?  Over the past couple of months I have been doing a ton of work for clients who […]

Quick comparison of MyISAM, Infobright, and MonetDB

Recently I was doing a little work for a client who has MyISAM tables with many columns (the same one Peter wrote about recently). The client’s performance is suffering in part because of the number of columns, which is over 200. The queries are generally pretty simple (sums of columns), but they’re ad-hoc (can access […]

High-Performance Click Analysis with MySQL

We have a lot of customers who do click analysis, site analytics, search engine marketing, online advertising, user behavior analysis, and many similar types of work.  The first thing these have in common is that they’re generally some kind of loggable event. The next characteristic of a lot of these systems (real or planned) is […]