April 16, 2014

Analyzing WordPress MySQL queries with Query Analytics

This blog, MySQLPerformanceBlog.com, is powered by WordPress, but we never really looked into what kind of queries to MySQL are used by WordPress. So for couple months we ran a Query Analytics (part of Percona Cloud Tools) agent there, and now it is interesting to take a look on queries. Query Analytics uses reports produced […]

Increasing slow query performance with the parallel query execution

MySQL and Scaling-up (using more powerful hardware) was always a hot topic. Originally MySQL did not scale well with multiple CPUs; there were times when InnoDB performed poorer with more  CPU cores than with less CPU cores. MySQL 5.6 can scale significantly better; however there is still 1 big limitation: 1 SQL query will eventually use only […]

Introducing Percona Cloud Tools for MySQL

I am proud to announce Percona Cloud Tools, the next generation of tools for MySQL.  I have been developing tools for MySQL for 10 years.  For the last 5 years, I have been developing Percona Toolkit (formerly “Maatkit”).  Almost 1 year ago, we began developing Percona Cloud Tools (PCT), first in-house, then in private beta, […]

Designing one to many relations – MongoDB vs MySQL

We already discussed one to one relations in MongoDB, and the main conclusion was that you should design your collections according to the most frequent access pattern. With one to many relations, this is still valid, but other factors may come into play. Let’s look at a simple problem: we are a shop and we […]

Using the new spatial functions in MySQL 5.6 for geo-enabled applications

Geo-enabled (or location enabled) applications are very common nowadays and many of them use MySQL. The common tasks for such applications are: Find all points of interests (i.e. coffee shops) around (i.e. a 10 mile radius) the given location (latitude and longitude). For example we want to show this to a user of the mobile […]

Innotop: A real-time, advanced investigation tool for MySQL

GUI monitoring tools for MySQL are not always suitable for all our needs or situations. Most of them are designed to provide historical views into what happens to our database over time rather then real-time insight into current MySQL server status. Excellent free tools for this include Cacti, Zabbix, Ganglia, Nagios, etc. But each of […]

MySQL Security Webinar: Follow-up Q&A

Thanks to everyone who attended last week’s webinar on MySQL security; hopefully you’ve all gone out and set SELinux to enforcing mode if you weren’t already running that way. If you weren’t able to attend, the recording and slides are available for viewing/download. But now, without further ado, here are the questions which we didn’t […]

Is your MySQL buffer pool warm? Make it sweat!

Today’s blog post diving into the waters of the MySQL buffer pool is a cross-post from Groupon’s engineering blog, and is Part 1 of 2. Thank you to Kyle Oppenheim at Groupon for contributing to this project and post. We’ll be posting Part 2 on Thursday. I’ll be at the Percona Live MySQL Conference and […]

MySQL 5.6 vs MySQL 5.5 and the Star Schema Benchmark

So far most of the benchmarks posted about MySQL 5.6 use the sysbench OLTP workload.  I wanted to test a set of queries which, unlike sysbench, utilize joins.  I also wanted an easily reproducible set of data which is more rich than the simple sysbench table.  The Star Schema Benchmark (SSB) seems ideal for this. […]

Profiling MySQL Memory Usage With Valgrind Massif

There are times where you need to know exactly how much memory the mysqld server (or any other program) is using, where (i.e. for what function) it was allocated, how it got there (a backtrace, please!), and at what point in time the allocation happened. For example; you may have noticed a sharp memory increase […]